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Nezinscot ScTug - History

Nezinscot ScTug - History


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Nezinscot
(ScTug: dp. 156; 1. 85'; b. 19'; dr. 8'6"; s. 10 k.; cpl. 15; a. 1 6 pdr., 1 Colt)

Nezinscot, a converted steel tug was built as D.C. Ivans in 1897 by Neafie and Levy, Philadelphia, Pa.; purchased by the Navv from Moran and Co. 25 March 1898; and commissioned at Key West, Fla., 2 April 1898, Boatswain J.J. Holden in command.

Serving with the North Atlantic Fleet during the SpanishAmerican War, operating out of Key West, Nezinscot remained in that port following the end of hostilities until the middle of 1900 when she sailed first to Norfolk and then early in 1901 to the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H. For the next eight and one half years, the tug operated out of Portsmouth, towing numerous ships, from the battleship Missouri (BB-11) to the smallest auxiliary barge, and making brief voyages to New York Navy Yard, ports in Maine, and most frequently to Boston. While steaming to Boston, Nezinscot capsized and sank off Cape Ann, Mass. 11 August 1909.


The Nezinscot was originally constructed by Neafie and Levy in 1897 as the DeWitt C. Ivans for Moran and Company. She was purchased for $30,000 by the United States Navy on March 25, 1898. The 85-foot iron-hulled tug was commissioned on April 2, 1898 and operated out of Key West, FL serving in the North Atlantic Fleet during the Spanish American War. Beginning in 1901, the Nezinscot operated out of Portsmouth, NH running between ports in New York, Massachusetts and Maine. While steaming from Portsmouth to Boston carrying a cargo of chains, anchors and search light equipment for the USS Missouri, the Nezinscot capsized and sank when a deck load shifted in heavy seas off Cape Ann on August 11, 1909. Of the nine person crew, there were four fatalities.

A research team aboard the dive vessel, GAUNTLET, led by Captain Heather Knowles and Captain David Caldwell located the wreck and conducted survey diving operations at the wreck site beginning in July 2007. Dive teams accomplished photographic and physical documentation of the wreck. The team, among the first to see the Nezinscot in 98 years, included Captain Eric Takakjian, Peter Piemonte, Scott Tomlinson, Pat Beauregard, Brian Holmes, Steve Pace, Tim Dwyer, Roman Ptashka, and Jeff Downing.


It was first settled in 1776 by Benjamin Spaulding from Chelmsford, Massachusetts, a fur trapper. Abijah Buck and Thomas Allen settled in the area in spring of 1777 with their families. In 1785, the inhabitants procured a survey of the town and purchased it from Massachusetts for 2 shillings per acre. Originally called Bucktown Plantation (or Plantation No. 5), in 1793 the Massachusetts General Court incorporated it as Buckfield, named for Abijah Buck. [5]

The surface of the town is uneven, but has deep, dark soil that yielded good crops of grain, corn and apples. The east and west branches of the Nezinscot River join at Buckfield Village, supplying water power for mills. Products included lumber, roof shingles, barrel staves, box boards, shovel handles, snow-shovels, handsleds, drag-rakes, brushes, brush blocks, powder-kegs, leather harness, cutting-blocks and men's boots. [6] In 1870, the population of the town was 1,494. The Rumford Falls and Buckfield Railroad passed through the town. Its depot was at Buckfield Village, the business center for the area. [7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 37.77 square miles (97.82 km 2 ), of which, 37.53 square miles (97.20 km 2 ) of it is land and 0.24 square miles (0.62 km 2 ) is water. [2] Buckfield is drained by the Nezinscot River, a tributary of the Androscoggin River.

The town is crossed by state routes 117 and 140. It borders the towns of Sumner and Hartford to the north, Turner to the east, Hebron to the south, and Paris to the west and West Paris to the northwest.

Historical population
Census Pop.
18001,002
18101,251 24.9%
18201,501 20.0%
18301,514 0.9%
18401,629 7.6%
18501,657 1.7%
18601,705 2.9%
18701,494 −12.4%
18801,379 −7.7%
18901,200 −13.0%
19001,139 −5.1%
19101,087 −4.6%
1920957 −12.0%
1930972 1.6%
1940903 −7.1%
1950899 −0.4%
1960982 9.2%
1970929 −5.4%
19801,333 43.5%
19901,566 17.5%
20001,723 10.0%
20102,009 16.6%
2014 (est.)2,000 [8] −0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]

2010 census Edit

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 2,009 people, 821 households, and 547 families living in the town. The population density was 53.5 inhabitants per square mile (20.7/km 2 ). There were 890 housing units at an average density of 23.7 per square mile (9.2/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 97.7% White, 0.2% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.5% of the population.

There were 821 households, of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.4% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the town was 41.2 years. 23.2% of residents were under the age of 18 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24 25.1% were from 25 to 44 32.9% were from 45 to 64 and 11.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 51.0% male and 49.0% female.

2000 census Edit

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 1,723 people, 668 households, and 476 families living in the town. The population density was 45.7 people per square mile (17.7/km 2 ). There were 715 housing units at an average density of 19.0 per square mile (7.3/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 100% [98.49% White, 0.17% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.41% of the population.

There were 668 households, out of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 26.8% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $36,821, and the median income for a family was $40,078. Males had a median income of $28,472 versus $22,262 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,503. About 5.6% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.5% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.


Maine School for the Feeble-Minded to Pineland Farms, staggering evolution!

I recently revisited Pineland Center after 30 years. My long ago roots were as a direct service worker for a private non profit agency that took residents from Pineland into community settings to prepare them and the community for the impending shuttering of the institution. At that time Pineland was an institution of ill repute with federal law suits pending. See Article In short, it was a dark place by today’s standards and was officially closed in 1996.

On May 25, 2010 the view of Pineland, now Pineland Farms, is radically different. The campus houses CMP central offices, Doctors’ offices 5,000 acres of dairy farms that support the Pineland Creamery. It is a rejuvenated pristine combination of business, agriculture and nature.

The event for my return was the sixth annual Pineland Farms Trail Running Festival. It was two days of races spanning 5K to 50K with some fun eclectic races like a canine 5K and a 5K barefoot race.

There were training sessions between races and a wonderful beer and cheese event that highlighted Smuttynose Brewing Co. and the Pineland Farm Creamery. This event alone was worth the trip.

The Pineland Farms Market is a must see. It offers many Maine food products, as well as a wide assortment of products from the Pineland Farms Creamery. There is a place to have lunch and many Maine made products in the gift shop.

A personal highlight for me was finding wooden gift boxes made by the workers of The Nezinscot Guild. The beautiful irony of our wooden gift boxes being displayed at the Pineland Market is that some of our workers with developmental disabilities were residents of the old institution, Pineland Center.

Pineland Farms is a wonderful Maine rural phenomenon that really needs to be visited to be appreciated. There are several events throughout the year for varied interests.

Pineland Farms is the result of the generosity of the Libra Foundation. The Libra Foundation was created by Elizabeth B. Noyce to fund projects that benefit the people of Maine.

Take the trip to New Gloucester for an event or just swing by for the delicious food at the Pineland Market.

If you choose the trails festival, which I highly recommend for the ambiance and camaraderie, be ready for the beautiful but rugged terrain. Its not your every day road race.


9 Reasons To Visit Nezinscot Farm

There are lots of good reasons to visit Nezinscot Farm. Do you like organic, hormone and antibiotic free foods? They have it. Do you believe herbal remedies belong in your personal care portfolio? Read on. And if you like to meet the people that produce what you buy, then you’ll love this place. Without further ado, here are 9 reasons to visit the farm store.

Organic Produce, Meats & Farm Cheeses

1. Organic Farm Produce, Meat & Cheese

Of course, the first thing you look for at a farm store is food. You’ll find seasonal produce and locally foraged mushrooms which are sourced from their own land, Levesque Farm and Albert’s Organics. Cheese lovers adore the variety of farm-made hard and soft cheeses. Furthermore, the cheese originates with farm-raised animals. They make their own charcuterie from responsibly raised animals without the use of hormones and antibiotics. The animals feed on fermented grass and corn silage produced on the farm. Finally, depending on the season, you’ll find a wide and varying selection of beef, chicken, lamb, goat, pork, duck, rabbit and turkey products.

Farm Made Jams And Jellies

2. Farm Made Jams & Jellies And Canned Fruits And Vegetables

You’ll find the farm store packed with all manner of home made canned goods.

  • Jams and jellies using strawberries, rhubarb, peaches, citrus, oranges, grapes, blackberries and of course Maine blueberries
  • Fruits and veggies including green beans, corn, peaches, pears, tomatoes and garlic
  • Pickled items including dilly beans, little sours, bread & butter, sweet & sour, beets, garlic, carrots, cauliflower and garlic
  • Relishes and sauces that include zucchini, beets, tomatoes, apples, corn, and more

3. Farm Made Soap

The personal care section of the farm store offers a wide variety of locally made goat milk and oil based soaps.

4. Homemade Balms & Salves

The farm’s herbalist has 18 years experience in producing herbal based personal care products. You’ll find a wide variety of balms, salves, lotions, aromatherapy, essential oils and bath salts. In addition you’ll also discover a nice selection of tinctures, teas, bitters and digestives.

Wide Array Of Fiberist Looms

5. Fiberist Classes

Head on up to the second floor and discover a fiberist heaven. Every Saturday and Sunday, a variety of workshops run from 11 to 3. Workshops include specialties such as:

  • Spinning
  • Knitting
  • Crocheting
  • Needle Felting and
  • Basic Weaving.

The cost is $20 per hour plus the cost of materials. You may purchase materials there or bring your own.

They do request you call for or make online reservations to ensure they have enough space and material on hand.

A Great Selection Of Spinning Wheels

6. Fiberist Spinning Wheels And Yarns

Nezinscot Farms yarn comes from their own flock of Cormo and Shetland sheep, llama, alpaca, and goats. The wool is blended and spun at New England spinneries into 2 and 4-ounce skeins. They have a very good variety of material for sale. In addition they also have a selection of spinning wheels for sale as well.

The Yarn & Fiber Studio hosts retreats and a variety of workshops through the year. Please contact Nezinscot Farm directly for more information.

The Farm’s Organic, Medicinal Herb And Plant Garden

7. Medicinal Herb & Plant Garden

Want to see from where many of the ingredients for the farm store originate? Walk right outside and visit their medicine garden. You can even make an appointment for a tour with their resident herbalist.

Visit The Goats And Chickens

8. Visit The Farm’s Goats And Chickens

For me, walking around the farm and seeing the resident flocks and herds was fun. You can meet the goats that turn out the basis for the goat cheese you’ll find in the farm store. You’ll also have a chance to check out the chickens.

9. The Nezinscot Cafe

Open daily and serving from 8AM to 3PM, the cafe serves both breakfast and lunch most days. They offer a wide variety of from-scratch, handcrafted menu items. Specialty items include Scotch Eggs & Toast, a house Reuben Burger and Poutine. Be sure to check their hours of operation before heading out if the cafe is an important part of your visit.

There is so much more to take in at the Nezinscot Farm Store than I’ve covered here. Do yourself a favor and find some time to explore this gem of rural Maine.

Finally, if after your time at Nezinscot Farm you’re feeling a bit parched, stop by Ricker Hill Orchards on your way back to the Wolf Cove Inn. Ricker Hill has a hard cider tasting room and it’s right on your way home. It too is located in Turner Maine and it is right off of route 117 (which you’ll be taking on your way home.)

Enjoy Beautiful Sunsets At Wolf Cove Inn


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Nezinscot ScTug - History

We've designed Our Lodge Page to be intuitive for even the most novice webmaster. However, here are some directions and tips to make setting and maintaining your lodge page simple. Here's a list of topics:

Basics

Features

Support

If you have unanswered questions or concerns email us or give us a call at 866.895.8189 (M-F 9:00 - 5:30 ET)

Getting Started

To access your lodge's website as webmaster, do the following:

  1. Ensure that you're indicated as a webmaster for your lodge in Groupable|m2
  2. Go to your lodge's Our Lodge Page website.
  3. Select 'Sign in' from the menu.
  4. Click 'create account' and enter the requested information.

It is important that you complete the account creation process in one sitting. You will need a cell phone or email address in Groupable|m2 to verify yourself during the process.

Once you've created your account, if you're a webmaster, you'll see 'Dashboard' in the footer menu for your lodge's website.

Dashboard

The dashboard is accessible through the footer menu of your lodge's website.

On the dashboard, you'll see a table of features with either an 'X' or a '✓' to indicate whether that feature is enabled. Click the manage link next to a feature to modify that setting. Each feature exists as one or more of the following:

  • Block - displayed on the left or right side of the home page.
  • View - displayed in the center of the home page.
  • Page - appears in the menu and is its own page.

Layout

The home page is laid out in as many as three columns: left, center, and right.

The "center" column contains 'views' from different features always starting with a basic information view. Other views are displayed if enabled via the dashboard in the order specified on their manage screen.

The "left" and "right" columns contain 'blocks' from the different features if enabled through the dashboard. Which column the block is in and in what order is determined by settings on each feature's manage screen. If there are no blocks assigned to a column, that column is not used in the layout with the center expanded to fill the void.

Calendar

The calendar feature is implemented as both a page of its own as well as a 'block' and 'view' previews on the home page.

Once the calendar is enabled via the dashboard, manage events on the calendar on the calendar page itself. Calendar events have the following attributes:

Member only events are only visible to members who are logged in.

Files

The files feature is implemented as a page.

Once the files feature is enabled via the dashboard, folders and files are created through the files page itself.

Folders exist to contain files and have the following attributes:

Folders that are limited to member access, along with their content, are only visible to logged in members.

Files have the following attributes:

Files that are limited to member access are only visible to logged in members.

Links

The links feature is implemented as a page.

Once the links feature is enabled via the dasboard, headings and links are created through the links page itself.

Headings group together links for presentation and have the following attributes:

Links have the following attributes:

  • Link Heading (under which it will appear)
  • Name (if blank, the URL will be displayed)
  • Description
  • URL
  • Order (the order in which the links will be listed under the heading)

All links are publically visible.

Photos

The photos feature is implemented as both a page of its own as well as a 'block' and 'view' on the home page.

Once the photos feature is enabled via the dashboard, albums and photos are created through the photos page. (Note: The photos block and view will not appear until there are photos to display.)

Albums group together photos and have the following attributes:

Photos have the following attributes:

  • Album (in which they will appear)
  • Caption
  • Image (the actual upload)
  • Order (the order in which the albums will be displayed)
  • Featured

All photos are publically visible.

If any photos are flagged as 'Featured', the block on the home page displays the most recent Featured photo and the slideshow view on the front page shows all the Featured photos, newest first.

The past officers feature is implemented as both a page of its own as well as a view' on the home page.

Once the news feature is enabled via the dashboard, posts can be authored via the news page. A post has the following attributes:

Posts are displayed newest first.

Current Officers

The current officers feature is implemented as both a page of its own as well as a 'block' and 'view' on the home page.

Once enabled, the current officers page, block and view display the current officers of the lodge. The Groupable|m2 membership server authors all data, and the ordering of that data. Any errors/omissions should be corrected there.

The content of the current officers page is publically visible.

You can determine what, if any, contact information is displayed through the dashboard.

Past Officers

The past officers feature is implemented as both a page of its own as well as a 'block' and 'view' on the home page.

Once enabled, the past officers page, block and view display the past officers of the lodge. The Groupable|m2 membership server authors all data, and the ordering of that data. Any errors/omissions should be corrected there.

The content of the past officers page is publically visible.

Directions

The directions feature is implemented as a page.

The directions page is for directions to the lodge. The page is both enabled and authored through the dashboard using a WYSIWYG editor (like an embedded word processor.) In addition, if a Location address is provided, a Google Map will be displayed focused on that address.

The content of the directions page is publically visible.

History

The history feature is implemented as a page.

The history page is for history of the lodge. The page is both enabled and authored through the dashboard using a WYSIWYG editor (like an embedded word processor.)

The content of the history page is publically visible.

About

The about feature is implemented as a page.

The about page, once enabled, displays information authored by the organization to which the lodge belongs and is publically visible.

The join feature is implemented as a page.

The join page, once enabled, displays information authored by the organization to which the lodge belongs and is publically visible.

Charities

The charities feature is implemented as a page.

The charities page, once enabled, displays information authored by the organization to which the lodge belongs and is publically visible.


Nezinscot ScTug - History

Hunting New England Shipwrecks

Click on thumbnail image for a larger view

Nezinscot sinking report
from the Boston Globe
(Boston Globe archives)

Tug Nezinscot
in her better days
(NADE)

Engine room scene
on old steam tug
(Steve Lang collection)

Old tugs at dock
(Steve Lang collection)

The table below provides historical and statistical data on the vessel. Some of the information may be incomplete. If you have additions or corrections, please e-mail us at the address listed below.

Attention Divers
The information on this page was obtained from a variety of sources. Although we have attempted to make it as accurate as possible, it may contain errors. For your personal safety, use extreme caution when diving on this wreck.

For more information on this wreck's location and history, and water and diving conditions in the area, contact local dive shop personnel, dive charter boat operators and local fishermen. Also check out the other shipwreck Websites listed on our Favorite Links page.

To go to other pages on this site, use the Site Navigator at left, or click here to go to our Home Page.


15. Old Fort Western Museum

Source: Wangkun Jia / shutterstock Old Fort Western Museum

Located just off the scenic shores of the Kennebec River in Maine’s capital, the Old Fort Western Museum was originally constructed in the mid-1700s and is one of the most well preserved all-wooden forts of its kind in the country.

Many of the museum’s staff are dressed in period clothing and go about their days much the way the fort’s original inhabitants did they use the language of the day as well.

It’s a big hit with kids and a unique way to learn about the area’s history. Many of the items on display are original artifacts and include weapons, clothes, and housewares.



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