Articles

Aerial Photo of Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Aerial Photo of Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands.



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Aerial Photo of Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands.

This aerial photo shows a US bombing raid on Emidj Island, the easternmost island in Jaluit Atoll, one of the Marshall Islands.

Many thanks to Robert Hall for sending us these pictures, which came from his father-in-law Lt. Col John Marie Robert Audette, an intelligence officer in the Pacific, serving with the 38th Bombardment Squadron, 30th Bombardment Group.


Aerial Photo of Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands. - History



SATURDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1942 A B-17 flies a photo reconnaissance mission over Wake Island.
SUNDAY, 7 JUNE 1942 Major General Clarence L Tinker, Commanding General 7th Air Force, is lost during the night of 6/7 Jun while leading a flight of LB-30s from Midway Island for a predawn attack on Wake Island.
FRIDAY, 26 JUNE 1942 3 LB-30s bomb installations on Wake Island. The raid takes place during the night of 26/27 Jun and is staged through Midway Island.
FRIDAY, 31 JULY 1942 1 B-17, from Midway Island, flies photo reconnaissance of Wake Island. The B-17 is Intercepted by 6 fighters in the ensuing fight US gunners claim 4 fighters destroyed.
TUESDAY, 22 DECEMBER 1942 Detachments of the 370th, 372d and 424th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy), 307th Bombardment Group (Heavy) based in the Territory of Hawaii with B-24s arrives on Midway Island. During the night of 22/23 Dec, 26 B-24s bomb Wake Island from 2,500 to 8,000 feet, dropping 135x500 pound bombs. The total length of the mission, from Hawaii and return, was over 4,300 nautical miles. No aircraft were lost.

MONDAY, 25 JANUARY 1943 Six B-24s carry out a photographic reconnaissance missions over Wake Island and drop 60 bombs. They claim one fighter shot down.
SATURDAY, 15 MAY 1943 7 B-24's from Midway Island bomb Wake Island 4 others abort and 7 others fail to find the target. 22 fighters intercept the formation the B-24's claim 4 shot down 1 B-24 is lost.
THURSDAY, 17 JUNE 1943 During the night of 17/18 Jun, 4 B-24's take off from Funafuti Atoll, Ellice Islands at 2-hour intervals to bomb Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. One aborts and another fails to find the target. The 2 heavy bombers bombing the target hit runways, silence an AA battery, and blow up an ammunition dump. The raid is a diversion in support of the first night photo-reconnaissance mission by the VII Bomber Command, during which 3 B-24's photograph Mille Atoll and nearby waters in the Marshall Islands.
SATURDAY, 19 JUNE 1943 During the night of 18/19 Jun, 2 B-24's fly photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands.
SUNDAY, 20 JUNE 1943 During the night of 19/20 Jun, 3 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands fly photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
SATURDAY, 24 JULY 1943 8 B-24's from Midway Island attack Wake Island, bombing oil storage, barracks, and a gun emplacement. 20-30 Zekes attack the formation 9 fighters are claimed destroyed 1 B-24 is lost in a collision with a falling Japanese fighter.
MONDAY, 26 JULY 1943 The last mission against Wake Island from Midway Island is flown. 8 B-24's bomb targets including oil storage area. 20+ fighters (including an aircraft identified as a possible Fw 190) intercept the formation. The B-24's claim 11 of the fighters shot down.

SATURDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 1943 Advanced HQ, Seventh Air Force, is set up on Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands to provide a HQ closer to targets in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands. VII Air Force Service Command and VII Bomber Command also establish forward echelons at Funafuti. Landing fields are being built on Baker Island and Nukufetau and Nanumea Islands in the Ellice Islands, to be used, along with existing fields at Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands as operational bases for attacks on Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands Mille Atoll , Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls in the Marshall Islands and Nauru Island. These operations will mark the assumption of the offensive by the Seventh Air Force and will play a conspicuous role in the invasion and occupation of the Gilbert and Marshall Islands.
SUNDAY, 14 NOVEMBER 1943 9 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands hit Mille Atoll .
MONDAY, 15 NOVEMBER 1943 20+ B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Jaluit Atoll and Mille Atoll as well as Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands.
TUESDAY, 16 NOVEMBER 1943 B-24's from Nanumea and Nukufetau Islands in the Ellice Islands bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls in the Marshall Islands. Single aircraft hit Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands and Little Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 17 NOVEMBER 1943 20+ B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands and Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll and Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands, and Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.
THURSDAY, 18 NOVEMBER 1943 19 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll
MONDAY, 22 NOVEMBER 1943 11 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll. The B-24's claim 2 interceptors shot down.
TUESDAY, 23 NOVEMBER 1943 6 B-24's from Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Emidj and Jabor Islands, Jaluit Atoll,.
THURSDAY, 24 NOVEMBER 1943 20 B-24's out of Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Maloelap Atoll, scoring hits on the landing ground and a cargo vessel.
SATURDAY, 27 NOVEMBER 1943 8 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll .
TUESDAY, 30 NOVEMBER 1943 10 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands strike Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 20 others, sent against the same target from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, run into bad weather 2 attack a cargo ship (and other vessels near Maloelap Atoll, the remaining 18 return to base without attacking.

WEDNESDAY, 1 DECEMBER 1943 4 B-24's, flying out of Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands, bomb Mille Atoll .
SATURDAY, 4 DECEMBER 1943 34 B-24's from the Ellice Islands and Canton Island bomb Mille Atoll 20+ others abort due to bad weather.
TUESDAY, 7 DECEMBER 1943 During the night of 6/7 Dec, 14 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, hit targets on Maloelap and Wotje Atolls in the Marshall Islands. 6 B-24's from Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Maloelap Atoll, and 1 other, failing to reach the primary, drops bombs on Mille Atoll . This date marks the beginning of Operation FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls in the Marshall Islands).
WEDNESDAY, 8 DECEMBER 1943 22 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, bomb Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands, and 11 from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll .
THURSDAY, 9 DECEMBER 1943 19 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll . The B-24's claim 5 fighters destroyed.
SUNDAY, 12 DECEMBER 1943 25 B-24's flying out of Ellice Island bases, bomb Emidj Island in the Marshall Islands.
MONDAY, 13 DECEMBER 1943 10 B-24's, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
TUESDAY, 14 DECEMBER 1943 16 B-24's, flying out of bases in the Ellice Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 15 DECEMBER 1943 20 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, hit Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. 10, staging from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands through Baker Island, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands. 1 B-24 is lost on Maloelap Atoll raid 2 enemy fighters are claimed destroyed.
FRIDAY, 17 DECEMBER 1943 10 B-24's are dispatched from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands to bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 9 are recalled because of weather 1 bombs the alternate target of Mille Atoll .
SATURDAY, 18 DECEMBER 1943 14 B-24's bomb Mille Atoll .
SUNDAY, 19 DECEMBER 1943 29 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands and Baker Island bomb barracks, hangars, and wharf areas on Mille Atoll and Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands they claim 7 fighters shot down. P-39's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands strafe Mille Atoll , destroying 3 airplanes and firing an oil dump 2 P-39's are lost.
MONDAY, 20 DECEMBER 1943 16 B-24's flying out of Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands and Baker Island bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 3 B-24's are shot down they claim 8 fighters destroyed.
TUESDAY, 21 DECEMBER 1943 8 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands escort 4 USN PB4Y's on a photo mission over Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The B-24's bomb shipping and aircraft landing grounds and other facilities at Roi, Ennuebing, and Kwajalein Islands in the Marshall Islands. A-24's, along with USN and US Marine Corps (USMC) aircraft, hit shipping and airfields at Emidj Island in the Marshall Islands. 16 P-39's strafe fuel dumps, shipping, and AA at Mille Atoll .
WEDNESDAY, 22 DECEMBER 1943 11 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands dive-bomb cargo ships in Mille Atoll lagoon in the Caroline Islands escort is provided by 32 P-39's and USN F6F's the P-39's strafe the ship and AA and gasoline dumps on the island and the vessel is left burning.
THURSDAY, 23 DECEMBER 1943 19 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, bomb Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands 9 others, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls in the Marshall Islands. 10 A-24's, escorted by 20 P-39's, attack Mille Atoll , hitting shore installations and a cargo vessel (wrecked by the previous day's raid) in the lagoon.
FRIDAY, 24 DECEMBER 1943 18 B-24's, staging through the Gilbert Islands from the Ellice Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
SATURDAY, 25 DECEMBER 1943 10 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, supported by P-39's, attack Mille Atoll , hitting the runway, ammunition storage, and an AA position.
SUNDAY, 26 DECEMBER 1943 16 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands. P-39's fly reconnaissance and strafing missions over Mille Atoll .
TUESDAY, 28 DECEMBER 1943 15 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands and Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands and Baker Island, hit Maloelap and Majuro Atolls in the Marshall Islands and Mille Atoll . 18 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, with an escort of 20 P-39's, attack Mille Atoll this attack is followed by another against the atoll carried out by 9 B-25's from Tarawa, supported by 12 Makin-based P-39's.
THURSDAY, 30 DECEMBER 1943 17 B-24's, flying from Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, bomb Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands and 9 B-25's from Tarawa hit the town of Jabor on Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands. A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, escorted by 24 P-39's, dive-bomb gun positions on Mille Atoll .



SATURDAY, 1 JANUARY 1944 16 P-39's strafe the harbor of Mille Atoll in the Marshall Islands and attack shipping N of the atoll 2 small vessels are heavily damaged. During the month of Jan 44, HQ VII Bomber Command transfers from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands to Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.
SUNDAY, 2 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll 9 B-25's hit targets on Jaluit Atoll and P-39's strafe shipping at Mille Atoll.
MONDAY, 3 JANUARY 1944 24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb AA positions and radar and radio facilities on Mille Atoll. 20 supporting P-39's strafe runways and oil storage.
TUESDAY, 4 JANUARY 1944 18 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb Emidj Island, Marshall Islands.
SATURDAY, 8 JANUARY 1944 15 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb shipping and shore installations at several locations on Wotje, Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, Marshall Islands and 2 B-25's from Tarawa hit shipping and gun positions on Jaluit.
MONDAY, 10 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 4 P-39's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands strafe Mille Atoll 1 of the P-39's drops 2 500-lb (227 kg) bombs on the fuel storage area during the night of 10/11 Jan, 16 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands from the Ellice Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll 4 others, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island, Phoenix Islands, hit Mille Atoll.
TUESDAY, 11 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands hit 5 vessels and land installations at Maloelap Atoll a 5000-ton cargo ship and a small vessel are sunk 4 P-39's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb and strafe runways on Mille Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 12 JANUARY 1944 21 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb AA positions and the storage area on Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands and 20 supporting P-39's strafe runways.
THURSDAY, 13 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands attack harbor shipping at Wotje Atoll 21 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb dock, barracks, and storage area on Mille Atoll some of the 16 escorting P-39's strafe ground targets, and 10 other P-39's carry out strafing mission over Mille Atoll.
FRIDAY, 14 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 12 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb 3 islands in Kwajalein Atoll 3 B-25's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands fly a mission against shipping at Wotje Atoll 2 of the B-25's attack 2 small vessels, sinking 1 and damaging the other the other B-25 bombs a runway and building on the S part of Wotje.
SATURDAY, 15 JANUARY 1944 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands flying at deck-level bomb and strafe shipping and shore installations at Maloelap Atoll, Marshall Islands 2 vessels are hit and the oil dump, hangars, other buildings, and runways are damaged 1 B-25 crashes at sea after being hit by AA fire.
SUNDAY, 16 JANUARY 1944 25 A-24's, 16 P-39's, and 8 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands strike Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands the A-24's bomb and strafe AA positions and storage areas, the P-40's bomb and strafe barracks and AA emplacements and the P-39's strafe runways 2 P-39's are lost P-39's sent up on interceptor missions claim 3 Japanese airplanes destroyed over Mille Atoll and Makin Island.
MONDAY, 17 JANUARY 1944 9 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb and strafe Mille Atoll hitting the runway, AA positions, radio tower, warehouse area, lagoon dredges and possible oil dumps. 4 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb and strafe the Mille Atoll landing ground.
TUESDAY, 18 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 12 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, attack barracks area, runway and gun position on the N part of Mille Atoll 25 A-24's and 8 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands pound the oil storage area on the S side of Jabor Island in Jaluit Atoll the P-40's also strafe a radio station in the target area.
WEDNESDAY, 19 JANUARY 1944 17 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands flying at low altitude, the B-25's score hits on gun positions, fuel dumps, and the airfield area in general AA fire claims 2 B-25's.
THURSDAY, 20 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 13 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Wotje Atoll during the night of 19/20 Jan 8 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb Rakaaru Island other B-25's sent from Tarawa Atoll against shipping at Ailinglapalap Atoll, abort because of bad weather 9 P-40's from the Gilbert Islands strafe a corvette and a schooner at Jaluit Atoll, mortally damaging both vessels 4 other P-40's bomb Mille Atoll.
FRIDAY, 21 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 16 B-24's staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands during the night of 20/21 Jan, bomb targets on Kwajalein Atoll 6 Tarawa-based B-25's hit Arno Atoll, and 12 bomb Aur Atoll 9 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, hit gun positions, barracks, and runways on Mille Atoll 23 A-24's and 11 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, attack gun positions, ammunition and oil storage, barracks, and 2 small vessels at Jaluit Atoll.
SATURDAY, 22 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 18 B-24's, flying from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit targets on Kwajalein, Jaluit and Mille Atoll 10 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands hit Maloelap Atoll 9 others, flying out of Tarawa, bomb shipping and shore installations at Wotje Atoll 3 B-25's are lost during the day's missions 10 Japanese aircraft are claimed shot down.
SUNDAY, 23 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 21 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, hit Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll the B-25's claim 3 fighters shot down 23 B-24's, flying out of Makin and Abemama Islands, Gilbert Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll at dusk 1 B-24 bombs Mille Atoll during return flight after developing engine trouble.
MONDAY, 24 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, supported by 12 P-39's and 7 P-40's, hit gun positions, storage areas, and barracks on Mille Atoll. In the late afternoon, 8 B-25's, staging through Makin Island, bomb the airfield on Wotje Atoll. During the night of 24/25 Jan, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, and 12 B-24's from the Ellice Islands, bomb several targets in Maloelap Atoll. 1 other B-24 bombs Mille Atoll.
TUESDAY, 25 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, supported by 12 P-39's, attack gun positions on Mille Atoll 8 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb a vessel and shore targets at Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll later, in a dusk attack, 18 B-24's flying out of the Gilbert Islands bomb Kwajalein Atoll, hitting runways and AA positions.
WEDNESDAY, 26 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, hit several targets in Maloelap Atoll about 20 fighters attack the formation 12 P-40's, meeting the returning B-25's over Aur Atoll, join the battle against the fighters, claiming 10+ destroyed the B-25's claim 5 shot down several more are destroyed on the ground or while taking off during the bombing raid. 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands hit Aineman Island in Jaluit Atoll, and nearby shipping.
THURSDAY, 27 JANUARY 1944 In the Gilbert Islands, 6 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll hit Nauru Island, and 9 staging through Makin Island hit Wotje Atoll, Marshall Islands 23 A-24's, supported by 10 P-39's, pound Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands and 7 B-24's, staging through Makin Island, bomb Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll in a dusk attack.
FRIDAY, 28 JANUARY 1944 AAF aircraft from the Gilbert Islands bomb the Marshall Islands, i.e., 9 B-25's, staging through Makin Island bomb Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island and taking off at varying intervals, carry out several hours of strikes against Wotje, Kwajalein, Maloelap, and Jaluit Atolls.
SATURDAY, 29 JANUARY 1944 As a US invasion force approaches the Marshall Islands, B-24's, attacking from bases in the Gilbert Islands, maintain day and night attacks (both multiple-plane missions and single-plane attacks at intervals) against Maloelap, Jaluit, Aur, Wotje, and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands. 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, also carry out a strike against shipping and shore installations at Wotje. 18 A-24's, supported by 12 P-40's, hit Jaluit. 12 P-39's, operating in flights of 4 aircraft, patrol and strafe Mille all day to deny the use of the airfield to the enemy.
SUNDAY, 30 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, P-40's and P-39's maintain patrols over Mille Atoll, bombing and strafing the airfield to prevent its use by the enemy against invading US forces B-24's maintain all-night strikes against Kwajalein Atoll in preparation for the invasion the following morning the invasion of Majuro Atoll begins during the night of 30/31 Jan.
MONDAY, 31 JANUARY 1944 In the Marshall Islands as US Army and USMC troops land on Kwajalein Atoll, under overall command of Admiral Raymond A Spruance, the USAAF hits other atolls. 19 A-24's bomb Mille Atoll airfield, over which P-39's and P-40's maintain all-day cover and harassment 9 P-40's carry out a strafing mission against Jaluit Atoll during the night of 31 Jan/1 Feb, 8 B-24's, attacking at intervals, bomb Wotje Atoll.

MONDAY, 1 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands hit the beach defenses on Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands P-40s on armed reconnaissance over Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands strafe a beached schooner. Operation CATCHPOLE (operations against Eniwetok and Ujelang Atolls in the Marshall Islands) is begun to occupy and defend Eniwetok Atoll, which is to furnish a striking base for operations against the Marianas Islands. During the operation, Seventh Air Force aircraft operating from newly acquired bases in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands neutralize airfields in the Marianas and continue to pound by-passed airfields in the Marshalls.
WEDNESDAY, 2 FEBRUARY 1944 A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island bomb runways and gun positions on Mille Atoll and along with P-39 escort strafe NE tip of the island B-24s from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands bomb Rongelap Island, Marshall Islands.
THURSDAY, 3 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island, bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.
FRIDAY, 4 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s, flying from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island, bomb Wotje, Maloelap and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands B-25s from Tarawa and Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands also hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls P-40s based on Makin Island bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.
SATURDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island dive- bomb and strafe oil storage area, radio facilities, and small craft at Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands P-39s strafe runways on Mille Atoll.
SUNDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap and Wotje Atolls A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island attack Mille Atoll Tarawa-based P-39s strafe Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls and P-40s from Makin Island hit a storage area at Jaluit Atoll.
TUESDAY, 8 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Makin and Abemama Islands hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls.
WEDNESDAY, 9 FEBRUARY 1944 A-24s from Makin Island along with supporting P-40s, bomb and strafe oil storage and gun positions on Jaluit Atoll during a dusk-to-dawn operation on 9/10 Feb B-24s operating at intervals from Tarawa Atoll maintain strikes against Wotje Atoll and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll.
THURSDAY, 10 FEBRUARY 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls 9 B-24s from Abemama Island, sent to bomb a weather and radio station on Rongelap Island, abort due to a fuel leak in the lead B-24 an attempt to bomb Jaluit Atoll during the return flight is unsuccessful.
FRIDAY, 11 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s and P-39s dive-bomb and strafe hangar, airfield installations and gun positions on Mille Atoll.
SATURDAY, 12 FEBRUARY 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls A-24s and P-39s from Makin Island bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.
SUNDAY, 13 FEBRUARY 1944 During the night of 13/14 Feb, B-24s from Tarawa Atoll operating individually at intervals, bomb Wotje and Mille Atolls and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll.
MONDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1944 40+ B-24s from the 11th and 90th Bombardment Groups (Heavy), flying out of Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll strike Ponape Island in the first Seventh Air Force raid on the Caroline Islands 2 of the B-24s hit the alternate target of Emidj Island.
TUESDAY, 15 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island pound Mille Atoll and Ponape Island 10 P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways and a disabled vessel at Mille Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 16 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll P-40s from Makin Island fly 2 bombing-strafing strikes against Jaluit Atoll A-24s bomb Mille Atoll.
THURSDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands, and Jaluit Atoll. P-40s strafe floatplanes off Emidj Island, as a USN Task Force begins a heavy attack on Truk Atoll.
FRIDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe Jaluit and Mille Atolls. US forces land on Engebi Island in Eniwetok Atoll.
SATURDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island pound Ponape and Kusaie Islands B-25s from Tarawa hit Wotje Atoll while Makin-based P-40s bomb and strafe Mille Atoll. US forces land on Eniwetok Island in Eniwetok Atoll.
SUNDAY, 20 FEBRUARY 1944 9 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb the airfield at Wotje Atoll P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb runways and small vessels at Mille Atoll.
MONDAY, 21 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands and Jaluit Atoll. B-25s from Abemama bomb Maloelap Atoll. P-40s from Makin Island hit Mille Atoll. US forces gain complete control of Eniwetok Island in Eniwetok Atoll. 9th Troop Carrier Squadron, Seventh Air Force, arrives at Hickam Field, Territory of Hawaii from the US with C-47s.
TUESDAY, 22 FEBRUARY 1944 1 B-24 bombs Kusaie Island. 8 A-24s and 9 P-40s from Makin Island bomb Mille Atoll 1 P-40 launches rockets against airfield targets in the first such attack by a Seventh Air Force aircraft.
WEDNESDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island bomb Mille Atoll 2 small boats are destroyed by strafing B-25s from Abemama Island hit Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll. B-24s from Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Kusaie and Ponape Islands and Jaluit Atoll.
THURSDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb the runway and radio installation on Mille Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield on Wotje Atoll.
FRIDAY, 25 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s out of Makin Island bomb and strafe targets at Jaluit Atoll B-25's from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Mille and Wotje Atolls B-24s from Abemama and Tarawa pound Ponape Island.
SATURDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island attack Wotje and Jaluit Atolls P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe targets on Mille Atoll. 27th and 38th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), based on Nanumea Island, Ellice Islands begin operating from Abemama and Makin Islands, respectively, with B-24s.
SUNDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 1944 A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island pound Jaluit and Mille Atolls, while B-25s from Abemama Island hit Wotje and Mille Atolls B-24s from Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Ponape Island.
MONDAY, 28 FEBRUARY 1944 P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb the runway and radio installation on Mille Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield on Wotje Atoll.
TUESDAY, 29 FEBRUARY 1944 B-24s bomb Maloelap, Mille and Wotje Atolls B-25s hit Jaluit and Mille Atolls P-40s attack Mille Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 1 MARCH 1944 B-25s pound Maloelap Atoll
THURSDAY, 2 MARCH 1944 B-25s bomb Maloelap Atoll.
FRIDAY, 3 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Maloelap Atoll.
SATURDAY, 4 MARCH 1944 P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways at Mille Atoll. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb airfield installations and runways in Wotje Atoll.
SUNDAY, 5 MARCH 1944 The Seventh Air Force continues to hit the Marshall and Caroline Islands P-40s from Makin Island carry out fighter-bomber mission against runways and airfield installations at Mille Atoll B-25s hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls B-24s bomb Ponape Island and last resort targets at Kusaie Island and Mille Atoll.
MONDAY, 6 MARCH 1944 A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways at Mille Atoll. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield at Wotje Atoll.
TUESDAY, 7 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Abemama Island Jaluit Atoll. P-40s bomb and strafe the airfield at Mille Atoll. B-25s pound runways, AA positions, storage areas, and barracks on Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 8 MARCH 1944 A-24s and P-40s, from Makin Island, bomb and strafe runways and AA positions at Mille Atoll. Tarawa Atoll-based B-25s pound Wotje Atoll.
THURSDAY, 9 MARCH 1944 B-25s based on Abemama Island attack Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll. B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands.
FRIDAY, 10 MARCH 1944 A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island and B-25s from Tarawa Atoll attack airfields, AA positions and radio installations at Mille and Wotje Atolls. B-25s, operating out of Engebi Island in Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands (secured by invading forces on 22 Feb) for the first time, bomb Kusaie Island.
SATURDAY, 11 MARCH 1944 B-24s, operating out of Kwajalein Atoll, for first time, carry out the Seventh's first raid from the Marshall Islands against Wake Island. P-40s and B-25s, operating from bases in the Gilbert Islands, pound Mille and Maloelap Atolls.
SUNDAY, 12 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Mille, Wotje and Maloelap Atolls and Nauru Island, Gilbert Islands. B-25s hit Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 13 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Kusaie Island. B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll pound Mille Atoll. 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Nanumea Island, Ellice Islands to Kwajalein Atoll the squadron continues operating from Makin Island with B-24s until 22 Mar.
TUESDAY, 14 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Kusaie Island. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 15 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll fly the first Seventh Air Force mission against Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, hitting Dublon and Eten Islands before dawn alternate targets of Oroluk Anchorage and Ponape Town are also hit. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll. By this date the A-24s, P-39s, and P-40s used against Mille and Jaluit Atolls during Operations FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls) and CATCHPOLE (operations against Eniwetok and Ujelang Atolls) have returned to Oahu, Territory of Hawaii for rest and re-equipment. 27th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Nanumea Island to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s they have been operating from Abemama Island since 26 Feb.
THURSDAY, 16 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island pound Wotje and Mille Atolls and Ormed Island, Wotje Atoll.
FRIDAY, 17 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll Atoll. 392d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Abemama Island to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.
SATURDAY, 18 MARCH 1944 2 B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb and strafe Ponape Island. 13 B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit Atoll while 5 from Tarawa Atoll hit the Atoll with bombs and cannon fire. 1 B-24 from Tarawa Atoll bombs Mille Atoll and photographs Mille and Majuro Atoll.
SUNDAY, 19 MARCH 1944 B-24s pound Wake Island from Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap, Jaluit, and Mille Atolls. 1 B-24 from Tarawa bombs Mille and photographs Mille and Majuro Atolls.
MONDAY, 20 MARCH 1944 12 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb the radio station and pier on Emidj Island, Marshall Islands. 1 other B-25 from Tarawa bombs Mille Atoll, rearms at Majuro Atoll, and again bombs Mille on the return trip. HQ 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) moves from Abemama Island to Kwajalein Atoll.
TUESDAY, 21 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Mille and Maloelap Atolls and Ponape Island. Tarawa-based B-25s also pound Maloelap Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Mille and Jaluit Atolls. 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), ceases operating from Makin Island and returns to base on Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island B-25s flying out of Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island and Tarawa Atoll-based B-25s strike Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, commencing a series of B-25 shuttle-missions between Tarawa or Makin Island and the USN's new base at Majuro Atoll which is used as the rearming base for the return strike.
FRIDAY, 24 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit while others, flying out of Eniwetok Atoll, hit Ponape Island and Ant Island, Caroline Islands.
SATURDAY, 25 MARCH 1944 Advanced HQ Seventh Air Force in Tarawa Atoll is disbanded and the Seventh's operations in the C Pacific forward area are placed under the VII Bomber Command at Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll pound Ponape Island and claim 4 fighters shot down. B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Maloelap Atoll. HQ VII Bomber Command moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll.
SUNDAY, 26 MARCH 1944 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-25s strike Ponape Island B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Jaluit again on the return flight to Tarawa.
MONDAY, 27 MARCH 1944 B-25s and B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap, Mille and Wotje Atolls B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll and strafe and cannonade Ponape Island and a single B-24 from Tarawa Atoll bombs Jabor in Jaluit Atoll.
TUESDAY, 28 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll pound Jaluit, Mille and Maloelap Atolls a single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, en route to Eniwetok Atoll, bombs Rongelap Atoll, Marshall Islands and B-24s, flying a night mission from Kwajalein, bomb targets at Truk Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 29 MARCH 1944 B-25s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Jaluit and Rongelap Atolls B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island while others from Tarawa Atoll bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.
THURSDAY, 30 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein and Eniwetok Atolls hit Truk Atoll before dawn. B-25s from Kwajalein and Tarawa Atolls strike Wotje, Mille, Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.
FRIDAY, 31 MARCH 1944 B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll in a predawn mission. B-25s from Eniwetok hit Ponape Island while others, flying out of Tarawa Atoll, pound Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls. 431st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.

SATURDAY, 1 APRIL 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands hit Truk.
SUNDAY, 2 APRIL 1944 B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands hit Truk Atoll during the night of 1/2 Apr. During the day B-25s bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.
MONDAY, 3 APRIL 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll during the night of 2/3 Apr, bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Abemama and Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls. 98th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Eniwetok Atoll with B-24s.
TUESDAY, 4 APRIL 1944 B-25s bomb s and Maloelap Atolls.
WEDNESDAY, 5 APRIL 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, bomb up again at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, and hit Jaluit Atoll during the return trip. HQ 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy) moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll.
THURSDAY, 6 APRIL 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island. B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island twice. B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Maloelap Atoll during the return flight.
FRIDAY, 7 APRIL 1944 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and bomb Jaluit Atoll on the return flight.
SATURDAY, 8 APRIL 1944 B-24s flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and bomb Jaluit Atoll during the return flight.
SUNDAY, 9 APRIL 1944 B-24s on a photo reconnaissance mission over Maloelap, Wotje, and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands, and a single Tarawa Atoll-based B-25 bombs Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll B-25s, in a shuttle mission from Abemama Island, bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and then hit Maloelap Atoll.
MONDAY, 10 APRIL 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll (1 hits Ponape Island) while B-25s, based on Abemama Island, strike Ponape. B-25s, flying a shuttle mission between Tarawa and Majuro Atolls, pound Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.
TUESDAY, 11 APRIL 1944 B-25s from the Gilbert Islands hit Ponape Island, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and carry out a shuttle mission against Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.
WEDNESDAY, 12 APRIL 1944 B-25s, flying out of Abemama Island, bomb Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Jaluit Atoll on the return trip.
THURSDAY, 13 APRIL 1944 B-24s out of Eniwetok Atoll strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and hit Maloelap Atoll.
FRIDAY, 14 APRIL 1944 PACIFIC OCEAN AREA (POA, Seventh Air Force): A single B-24, enroute from Kwajalein Atoll to Tarawa Atoll, bombs Jaluit Atoll B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island while B-25s from Abemama Island strike Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as an arming station between strikes Japanese bombers carry out an ineffective raid on Eniwetok Atoll. 26th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.
SATURDAY, 15 APRIL 1944 B-25s, based on Tarawa Atoll, bomb Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and hit Jaluit and Mille Atolls on the return trip.
SUNDAY, 16 APRIL 1944 B-25s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Abemama Island hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between the strikes.
MONDAY, 17 APRIL 1944 B-25s, based on Tarawa Atoll, strike Maloelap and Mille Atolls, rearming at Majuro Atoll between the raids.
TUESDAY, 18 APRIL 1944 First Seventh Air Force attack on the Marianas Islands takes place as B-24s escorting USN aircraft on a photographic reconnaissance mission from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Saipan Island. Other B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll. B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island after failing to find shipping reported in the area and B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes.
WEDNESDAY, 19 APRIL 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.
THURSDAY, 20 APRIL 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll search the area near Wake Island for shipping finding none, the bombers hit Wake and Peale Islands. Tarawa Atoll based B-25s, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes, bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.
FRIDAY, 21 APRIL 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll. B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll, staging through Kwajalein, bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Ponape Island. Abemama Island-based B-25s, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base, bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.
SATURDAY, 22 APRIL 1944 During the night of 21/22 Apr, B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll other B-24s from Kwajalein follow with another raid on Wotje during the day. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming, bomb Jaluit, Maloelap and Mille Atolls.
SUNDAY, 23 APRIL 1944 B-24s based at Kwajalein Atoll hit Truk and Wotje Atolls. Makin Island-based B-25s hit Ponape Island and Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.
MONDAY, 24 APRIL 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Ponape Island while others, based on Makin Island, hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.
TUESDAY, 25 APRIL 1944 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s, during the night of 24/25 Apr, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Guam Island, Marianas Islands and Truk Atoll, and during the day hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls. This is the first AAF mission against Guam. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island, and Makin Island-based B-25s hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.
WEDNESDAY, 26 APRIL 1944 B-24s, having landed at Los Negros Island after bombing Guam Island on 25 Apr, hit Ponape Island and return to Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s based on Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.
THURSDAY, 27 APRIL 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 26/27 Apr. B-25s from Eniwetok follow up during the day with 3 raids on Ponape Island Makin Island-based B-25s hit Jaluit, Wotje and Mille Atolls. 1 B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, using Makin Island as a rearming base, bombs Jabor and Emidj and Enybor Islands, Jaluit Atoll.
FRIDAY, 28 APRIL 1944 B-25s, based on Makin Island, strike Jaluit and Mille Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes. A single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll bombs islands in Jaluit Atoll, hitting Emidj first, then rearming at Makin Island, and attacking Jabor and Enybor during the return flight.
SATURDAY, 29 APRIL 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk and Jaluit Atolls. B-25s from Makin Island also hit Jaluit Atoll .
SUNDAY, 30 APRIL 1944 41 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s bomb various targets at Wake Island. 11 Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit Atoll while 8 from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island.

MONDAY, 1 MAY 1944 B-25s from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands bomb Jaluit Atoll.
TUESDAY, 2 MAY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, during the night. During the day B-25s based on Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, Marshall Islands, using Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands as a shuttle base to rearm between strikes. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll pound Ponape Island, Caroline Islands.
WEDNESDAY, 3 MAY 1944 B-25s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll while others, based at Makin Island, strike both Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between raids.
THURSDAY, 4 MAY 1944 12 B-25s, based at Makin Island, pound Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming between the strikes. 39 B-24s from Kwajalein and Eniwetok Atolls hit Ponape Island.
FRIDAY, 5 MAY 1944 During the night of 4/5 MAY B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll stage through Eniwetok Atoll and bomb Truk Atoll. During the day B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island, and 10 from Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, Marshall Islands, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between the attacks.
SATURDAY, 6 MAY 1944 B-25s from Makin Island and Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje and Jaluit Atolls. B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, escort USN aircraft on a photo reconnaissance of Guam Island, Marianas Islands. The B-24s bomb Guam from 20,000 ft (6,096 m), scoring hits on 2 airfields and a town area and proceed to Los Negros Island, Admiralty Islands to prepare for the return flight the B-24s claim 4 enemy aircraft shot down.
SUNDAY, 7 MAY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 6/7 May. B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island during the following day. Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.
MONDAY, 8 MAY 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island strike Ponape Island while Makin Island-based B-25s pound Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes. B-24s that landed at Los Negros Island after the strike on Guam Island on 6 MAY return to the Marshall Islands, bombing Ponape Island en route.
TUESDAY, 9 MAY 1944 During the night of 8/9 MAY B-24s stage through Kwajalein Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll. Makin Island-based B-25s hit Wotje and Jaluit Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming point between attacks.
WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island during the night of 9/10 May. During the DAY, B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island while Makin Island-based B-25s raid Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.
THURSDAY, 11 MAY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 10/11 May. During the day B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island while others, based on Makin Island, pound Jaluit Atoll.
FRIDAY, 12 MAY 1944 A single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll bombs Jaluit Atoll.
SATURDAY, 13 MAY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the early morning hours. Other B-24s from Kwajalein bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, Marshall Islands. B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island.
SUNDAY, 14 MAY 1944 53 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll and 43 B-25s from Makin Island join USN aircraft in pounding Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 15 MAY 1944 Operations are limited to photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll.
TUESDAY, 16 MAY 1944 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s pound Wake Island.
WEDNESDAY, 17 MAY 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island while Engebi Island-based B-25s hit Ponape Island.
THURSDAY, 18 MAY 1944 B-25s based on Makin Island bomb Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and attack the same target during the return flight to base.
FRIDAY, 19 MAY 1944 B-25s based on Engebi Island hit Ponape Island and B-25s from Makin Island hit Nanru Island.
SATURDAY, 20 MAY 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.
SUNDAY, 21 MAY 1944 53 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb various targets in Wotje Atoll 41 B-25s, based on Makin Island, follow up with bombing, cannonading and strafing attack on the atoll. 8 B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Rota Island, Marianas Islands, and rearm at Los Negros Island.
MONDAY, 22 MAY 1944 8 B-25s based on Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island. Weather cancels other strikes.
TUESDAY, 23 MAY 1944 Makin Island-based B-25s strike Jaluit Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 24 MAY 1944 B-25s from Makin Island pound Wotje and Jaluit Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming between the strikes. B-25s based at Engebi Island hit Ponape Island.
THURSDAY, 25 MAY 1944 B-25s flying out of Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.
FRIDAY, 26 MAY 1944 45 B-25s, flying out of Makin Island, attack Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll. 9 B-25s from Engebi Island fly a successful search mission for a downed B-25 crew in the vicinity of Ponape and Pakin Islands, Caroline Islands after locating the survivors, later picked up by USN destroyer, the B-25s attack Pakin and Ponape Islands with cannon and machinegun fire.
SATURDAY, 27 MAY 1944 24 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll and 52 B-25s from Engebi Island pound Ponape Island.
SUNDAY, 28 MAY 1944 29 B-25s stage from Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Jaluit Atoll, and land at Makin Island. B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Saipan and Guam Islands, Marianas Islands those bombing Guam turn south to Los Negros Island to rearm while the others return to Eniwetok. B-25s flying from Engebi Island bomb Mille Atoll. B-24s escort USN photo planes over the Marianas Islands. s
MONDAY, 29 MAY 1944 Operations are restricted to photo missions over Wotje, Mille, and Jaluit Atolls.
TUESDAY, 30 MAY 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island, which is also hit by B-24s returning from the shuttle base on Los Negros Island. 2 forces of B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll strike Truk Atoll and Wake Island.

THURSDAY, 1 JUNE 1944 B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island, Caroline Islands.
SATURDAY, 3 JUNE 1944 B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll in a pre-dawn raid B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Nauru Island.
SUNDAY, 4 JUNE 1944 During the night B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, hit Truk Atoll B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, follow with a daylight raid on Ponape Island.
MONDAY, 5 JUNE 1944 B-25s from Makin Island, hit Nauru Island B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll escort photo aircraft over Guam Island, Marianas Islands, bomb the island, and proceed to Los Negros Island for rearming. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island.
TUESDAY, 6 JUNE 1944 B-24s returning to Eniwetok Atoll from Los Negros Island (where they rearmed after bombing Guam Island the previous day) hit Ponape Island.
THURSDAY, 8 JUNE 1944 During the night of 7/8 Jun, B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll and Ponape Island. B-25s from Makin Island follow up during the day with a strike against Nauru Island.
FRIDAY, 9 JUNE 1944 During the night of 8/9 Jun B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll.
SATURDAY, 10 JUNE 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll and Ponape Island during the night of 9/10 Jun. B-25s from Makin Island hit Nauru Island during the day.
SUNDAY, 11 JUNE 1944 B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll during the night of 11/12 Jun. B-25s follow with a raid against Ponape Island during the morning.
MONDAY, 12 JUNE 1944 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s hit Truk Atoll during the night of 11/12 Jun and again during the day.
TUESDAY, 13 JUNE 1944 An attack during the night of 12/13 Jun by B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll against Truk Atoll and Ponape Island is followed by a daylight attack by Makin Island-based B-25s against Nauru and Ponape Islands.
SATURDAY, 17 JUNE 1944 B-24s, flying from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Ponape Island.
SUNDAY, 18 JUNE 1944 B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll.
MONDAY, 19 JUNE 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll. B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll pound Ponape Island.
TUESDAY, 20 JUNE 1944 Kwajalein Atoll based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.
WEDNESDAY 21 JUNE 1944 B-24s based on Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.
THURSDAY, 22 JUNE 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll, hit Truk Atoll 1 bombs Ponape Island.
FRIDAY, 23 JUNE 1944 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s strike Truk Atoll. B-25s from Engebi Island pound Ponape Island. During the evening, B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll also attack Ponape Island.
SUNDAY, 25 JUNE 1944 B-24s based on Kwajelein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.
TUESDAY, 27 JUNE 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.
THURSDAY, 29 JUNE 1944 B-24s, staging, through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll .
FRIDAY, 30 JUNE 1944 Detachment of 28th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Seventh Air Force (attached to VII Fighter Command), based at Kipapa Airfield, Territory of Hawaii, begins operating from Kwajalein Atoll with F-5s.

SATURDAY, 1 JULY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, during the night of 1/2 Jul and follow up with another raid during the day. .
MONDAY, 3 JULY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.
TUESDAY, 4 JULY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.
SATURDAY, 8 JULY 1944 During the night of 7/8 Jul B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll and bomb Truk Atoll more B-24s follow with another raid during the day.
SUNDAY, 9 JULY 1944 Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 10 JULY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll during the night of 9/10 Jul and again during the day.
WEDNESDAY, 12 JULY 1944 During the night of 11/12 Jul B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll during the day B-24s hit Truk Atoll again. P
THURSDAY, 13 JULY 1944 Kwajalein-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Makin Island pound Nauru Island.
SATURDAY, 15 JULY 1944 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, hit Truk Atoll.
MONDAY, 17 JULY 1944 48 B-25s from Makin Island stage through Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Ponape Island 47 of the B-25s (1 aborts) attack airfield facilities, AA positions, and other targets throughout the island.
TUESDAY, 18 JULY 1944 In the Marshall Islands, 5 B-24s, flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, hit Wotje Atoll. 25 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, attack Truk Atoll.
THURSDAY, 20 JULY 1944 P-47s pound Tinian Island. B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.
FRIDAY, 21 JULY 1944 P-47s attack enemy forces on Tinian Island. 28 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.
SUNDAY, 23 JULY 1944 B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll while others, flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, hit Wotje Atoll.
MONDAY, 24 JULY 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.
TUESDAY, 25 JULY 1944 B-24s, based at Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 26 JULY 1944 B-25s from Engebi Island attack Ponape Island.
THURSDAY, 27 JULY 1944 B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s based at Makin Island, hit Jaluit Atoll.
SUNDAY, 30 JULY 1944 BB-25s from Makin Island bomb Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 31 JULY 1944 B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 3 AUGUST 1944 B-24s from the Marshall Islands pound Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands.
FRIDAY, 4 AUGUST 1944 B-25s staging from the Marshall Island, hit Ponape Island. HQ 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) and 27th, 38th and 392d Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy) move from Kwajalein Atoll to Saipan Island with B-24s.
SUNDAY, 6 AUGUST 1944 B-25s flying out of the Marshall Islands hit Ponape Island and B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll.
TUESDAY, 8 AUGUST 1944 B-25s from the Marshall Islands hit Ponape Island while B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.
THURSDAY, 10 AUGUST 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.
SATURDAY, 12 AUGUST 1944 B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll .
MONDAY, 14 AUGUST 1944 From the Marshall Islands, B-25s hit Ponape Island and B-24s bomb Wotje Atoll. HQ VII Bomber Command moves from Kwajalein Atoll to Saipan Island.
WEDNESDAY, 16 AUGUST 1944 Marshall Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.
SUNDAY, 20 AUGUST 1944 Marshall Islands-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.
TUESDAY, 22 AUGUST 1944 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s hit Mille Atoll.
THURSDAY, 24 AUGUST 1944 Marshall Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll while B-25s hit Nauru Island.
MONDAY, 28 AUGUST 1944 Marshall Islands-based B-24s hit Truk Atoll.
WEDNESDAY, 30 AUGUST 1944 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s hit Mille Atoll.

FRIDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 1944 Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.
SATURDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 1944 Marshall Islands-based B-25s bomb Ponape Island, Caroline Islands and Nauru .
MONDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll strike Wotje Atoll.
FRIDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll.
SUNDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER 1944 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.
THURSDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Island .
SATURDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s in the Marshall Islands bomb Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll.
MONDAY, 18 SEPTEMBER 1944 28 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.
WEDNESDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s in the Marshall Islands hit Jaluit Atoll .
SATURDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 1944 On the night of 23/24 Sep a B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands bombs Wake Island.
SUNDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 1944 26 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk Island. The detachment of the 28th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Seventh AF, operating from Kwajalein Atoll with F-5s begins a movement to Peleliu Island.
MONDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 1944 During the night of 25/26 Sep Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll on a strike at shipping at Truk Island failing to locate the primary targets the B-24s bomb Tol, Eten, Param, and Moen Islands while others hit Wake Island during the night of 25/26 Sep.
TUESDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s from the Marshall Islands hit Wake Island during the night of 26/27 Sep.
WEDNESDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 1944 14 Marshall Islands based B-24s strike Truk Island.
FRIDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 1944 B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll pound Truk Island.
SATURDAY, 30 SEPTEMBER 1944 During the night of 30 Sep/1 Oct a Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24 bombs Wake Island.

4 OCTOBER 1944 B-24's from the Marshalls bomb A F at Moen.
6 OCTOBER 1944 A B-24 from Kwajalein bombs heavy gun battery on Emidj. During 6/7 Oct, 3 B-24's bomb Wake.
8 OCTOBER 1944 During the day and 8 9 Oct B-24's from the Marshalls bomb Wake.
9 OCTOBER 1944 25 B-25's from the Marshalls bomb Truk.
11 OCTOBER 1944 A Kwajalein-based B-24 bombs Wake during the night.
12 OCTOBER 1944 B-24's from Kwajalein bomb Wake during 12/13 Oct.
13 OCTOBER 1944 From the Marshalls B-24's pound Truk.
14 OCTOBER 1944 1 B-24 from the Marshalls bombs Wake during 14/15 Oct.
15 OCTOBER 1944 2 B-24's from the Marshalls bomb Wake on 15/16 Oct.
16 OCTOBER 1944 From the Marshalls 14 B-24's hit Truk. Sources: AIR FORCE COMBAT UNITS OF WORLD WAR II, Office of Air Force History, Headquarters USAF, 1961,
COMBAT SQUADRONS OF THE AIR FORCE, WORLD WAR II, Office of Air Force History, Headquarters USAF 1982
THE ARMY AIR FORCES IN WORLD WAR II: COMBAT CHRONOLOGY, 1941-1945 by the Office of Air Force History, Headquarters USAF, 1973.


RELATED ARTICLES

Now another recognised Earhart investigator, Mike Campbell, has also lashed out at what he described as 'bogus photo claims'.

Referring to how a number of TV networks were now 'breathlessly touting the photo', Campbell said it wasn't evidence of anything except that a Japanese ship, the Koshu Maru, was once in Jaluit Harbour.

There has been widespread claims throughout the decades that because Japanese forces were in the Marshall Islands in July 1937 - at the time Earhart's aircraft lost contact and crashed 'somewhere' - the Japanese believed she was a spy and took her to Saipan where she and Noonan died.

Campbell claims that the photo 'does little except discredit the truth'.

Tantalizing tandem: Earhart and Noonan had completed 22,000 miles of their 29,000 mile journey before taking off on what would be their last flight (pair above on June 11, 1937)

He says that Earhart and Noonan are 'absolutely not in the photo and it's incredible that anyone could believe they are'.

'Zoom in and you can see the upper half of a white man with black hair on the far left of the group on the dock,' he said, but adds that the features, the nose, the hairline are all wrong 'and any intelligent analysis rules him out'.

Campbell said that 'nobody in the photo remotely resembles Earhart inasmuch as anyone's facial features can be determined at all'.

MailOnline's investigation last year also concluded that if Earhart and Noonan had been captured by the Japanese, the suspected spies would have been under guard but there is no sign of any Japanese soldier on the jetty.

'The group on the dock appears to be out for a Sunday stroll, or awaiting someone's arrival from one of the ships in the harbour,' Campbell said.

As the MailOnline's investigator who uncovered the questionable photo notes: 'In the archives I found that the envelopes containing the photographs were stamped on the lower rear corner - something that was difficult to notice as they're in a three-ring binder/enclosure.

'The (aerial) surveillance photos in the first few envelopes were dated earlier than the 1940s, but the photos taken from on the island (Jaluit), that were in the latter envelopes, were dated 1940+'.

THE THEORIES ON AMELIA EARHART'S FINAL RESTING PLACE

Theory One: Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan crash into the Pacific a few miles short of their intended destination due to visibility and gas problems, and die instantly.

Theory Two: Earhart and Noonan crash land on the island of Nikumaroro, where they later die at the hands of coconut crabs, which hunt for food at night and grow up to three-feet long. The name comes from their ability to opened the hardened shells of coconuts.

Theory Three: Earhart and Noonan veer drastically off course and crash land near the Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands. They are rescued but soon taken as prisoners of war by the Japanese and sent to a camp in Saipan. Noonan is beheaded and Earhart dies in 1939 from malaria or dysentery.

Theory Four: Earhart and Noonan make it to Howland Island as planed and are eaten by cannibals.

Theory Five: Earhart was an American spy sent to gather information on the Japanese ahead of World War II.


Japanese Blogger Points Out Timeline Flaw In Supposed Earhart Photo

A Japanese military history buff has found library records showing a photo supposedly depicting Amelia Earhart survived a crash landing in 1937 was actually published two years before the famous aviator vanished.

The photograph in question was featured in a History Channel special and received widespread media attention. Here's how NPR's Laurel Wamsley described the discovery of the image:

"A former U.S. Treasury agent named Les Kinney found the photo in a box of papers from the Office of Naval Intelligence while scouring for evidence regarding Earhart's disappearance that might have been overlooked. The undated photo was in a box marked 'declassified.' Its caption reads 'PL-Marshall Islands, Jaluit Atoll, Jaluit Island. Jaluit Harbor. ONI #14381.' "

In the History Channel special, some analysts argued that the photo showed Earhart (sitting at the end of the dock, facing away from the camera) and her navigator Fred Noonan (on the far left of the image). They identified the ship in the background as the Koshu Maru, and argued that the Koshu Maru rescued Earhart and Noonan after they crash-landed in 1937.

But a Japanese military history blogger, who goes by @baron_yamaneko on Twitter, found evidence the photo predated Earhart's famous disappearance. The History Channel is aware of the evidence and says it is investigating.

In an English-language post, the blogger explains that "the photograph was first published in Palau under Japanese rule in 1935, in a photo book . So the photograph was taken at least two years before Amelia Earhart disappear[ed] in 1937 and a person on the photo was not her."

The photo book in question was digitized and published online by Japan's National Diet Library. The publication date is listed in the traditional Japanese style as "Showa 10" — that is, 1935.

The blogger also identifies the ship in the image as the Koshu, which the Japanese seized in World War I, rather than the Koshu Maru, which was launched in 1937.

The History Channel tells NPR it has "a team of investigators exploring the latest developments about Amelia Earhart and we will be transparent in our findings.

"Ultimately historical accuracy is most important to us and our viewers," spokeswoman Kirby Dixon said in a statement.


Combat Chronology of the US Army Air Forces in operations against and from the Marshall Islands

SATURDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1942
A B-17 flies a photo reconnaissance mission over Wake Island.

SUNDAY, 7 JUNE 1942
Major General Clarence L Tinker, Commanding General 7th Air Force, is lost during the night of 6/7 Jun while leading a flight of LB-30s from Midway Island for a predawn attack on Wake Island.

FRIDAY, 26 JUNE 1942
3 LB-30s bomb installations on Wake Island. The raid takes place during the night of 26/27 Jun and is staged through Midway Island.

FRIDAY, 31 JULY 1942
1 B-17, from Midway Island, flies photo reconnaissance of Wake Island. The B-17 is Intercepted by 6 fighters in the ensuing fight US gunners claim 4 fighters destroyed.

TUESDAY, 22 DECEMBER 1942
Detachments of the 370th, 372d and 424th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy), 307th Bombardment Group (Heavy) based in the Territory of Hawaii with B-24s arrives on Midway Island. During the night of 22/23 Dec, 26 B-24s bomb Wake Island from 2,500 to 8,000 feet, dropping 135x500 pound bombs. The total length of the mission, from Hawaii and return, was over 4,300 nautical miles. No aircraft were lost.

MONDAY, 25 JANUARY 1943
Six B-24s carry out a photographic reconnaissance missions over Wake Island and drop 60 bombs. They claim one fighter shot down.

SATURDAY, 15 MAY 1943
7 B-24's from Midway Island bomb Wake Island 4 others abort and 7 others fail to find the target. 22 fighters intercept the formation the B-24's claim 4 shot down 1 B-24 is lost.

THURSDAY, 17 JUNE 1943
During the night of 17/18 Jun, 4 B-24's take off from Funafuti Atoll, Ellice Islands at 2-hour intervals to bomb Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. One aborts and another fails to find the target. The 2 heavy bombers bombing the target hit runways, silence an AA battery, and blow up an ammunition dump. The raid is a diversion in support of the first night photo-reconnaissance mission by the VII Bomber Command, during which 3 B-24's photograph Mille Atoll and nearby waters in the Marshall Islands.

SATURDAY, 19 JUNE 1943
During the night of 18/19 Jun, 2 B-24's fly photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands.

SUNDAY, 20 JUNE 1943
During the night of 19/20 Jun, 3 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands fly photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

SATURDAY, 24 JULY 1943
8 B-24's from Midway Island attack Wake Island, bombing oil storage, barracks, and a gun emplacement. 20-30 Zekes attack the formation 9 fighters are claimed destroyed 1 B-24 is lost in a collision with a falling Japanese fighter.

MONDAY, 26 JULY 1943
The last mission against Wake Island from Midway Island is flown. 8 B-24's bomb targets including oil storage area. 20+ fighters (including an aircraft identified as a possible Fw 190) intercept the formation. The B-24's claim 11 of the fighters shot down.

SATURDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 1943
Advanced HQ, Seventh Air Force, is set up on Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands to provide a HQ closer to targets in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands. VII Air Force Service Command and VII Bomber Command also establish forward echelons at Funafuti. Landing fields are being built on Baker Island and Nukufetau and Nanumea Islands in the Ellice Islands, to be used, along with existing fields at Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands as operational bases for attacks on Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands Mille Atoll , Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls in the Marshall Islands and Nauru Island. These operations will mark the assumption of the offensive by the Seventh Air Force and will play a conspicuous role in the invasion and occupation of the Gilbert and Marshall Islands.

SUNDAY, 14 NOVEMBER 1943
9 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands hit Mille Atoll .

MONDAY, 15 NOVEMBER 1943
20+ B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Jaluit Atoll and Mille Atoll as well as Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands.

TUESDAY, 16 NOVEMBER 1943
B-24's from Nanumea and Nukufetau Islands in the Ellice Islands bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls in the Marshall Islands. Single aircraft hit Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands and Little Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.

WEDNESDAY, 17 NOVEMBER 1943
20+ B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands and Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll and Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands, and Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.

THURSDAY, 18 NOVEMBER 1943
19 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll.

MONDAY, 22 NOVEMBER 1943
11 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll. The B-24's claim 2 interceptors shot down.

TUESDAY, 23 NOVEMBER 1943
6 B-24's from Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Emidj and Jabor Islands, Jaluit Atoll.

THURSDAY, 24 NOVEMBER 1943
20 B-24's out of Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Maloelap Atoll, scoring hits on the landing ground and a cargo vessel.

SATURDAY, 27 NOVEMBER 1943
8 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands and Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll.

TUESDAY, 30 NOVEMBER 1943
10 B-24's from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands strike Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 20 others, sent against the same target from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, run into bad weather 2 attack a cargo ship (and other vessels near Maloelap Atoll, the remaining 18 return to base without attacking.

WEDNESDAY, 1 DECEMBER 1943
4 B-24's, flying out of Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands, bomb Mille Atoll.

SATURDAY, 4 DECEMBER 1943
34 B-24's from the Ellice Islands and Canton Island bomb Mille Atoll 20+ others abort due to bad weather.

TUESDAY, 7 DECEMBER 1943
During the night of 6/7 Dec, 14 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, hit targets on Maloelap and Wotje Atolls in the Marshall Islands. 6 B-24's from Nukufetau Island in the Ellice Islands bomb Maloelap Atoll, and 1 other, failing to reach the primary, drops bombs on Mille Atoll . This date marks the beginning of Operation FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls in the Marshall Islands).

WEDNESDAY, 8 DECEMBER 1943
22 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, bomb Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands, and 11 from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands bomb Mille Atoll.

THURSDAY, 9 DECEMBER 1943
19 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands bomb Mille Atoll . The B-24's claim 5 fighters destroyed.

SUNDAY, 12 DECEMBER 1943
25 B-24's flying out of Ellice Island bases, bomb Emidj Island in the Marshall Islands.

MONDAY, 13 DECEMBER 1943
10 B-24's, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

TUESDAY, 14 DECEMBER 1943
16 B-24's, flying out of bases in the Ellice Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

WEDNESDAY, 15 DECEMBER 1943
20 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, hit Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. 10, staging from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands through Baker Island, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands. 1 B-24 is lost on Maloelap Atoll raid 2 enemy fighters are claimed destroyed.

FRIDAY, 17 DECEMBER 1943
10 B-24's are dispatched from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands to bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 9 are recalled because of weather 1 bombs the alternate target of Mille Atoll.

SATURDAY, 18 DECEMBER 1943
14 B-24's bomb Mille Atoll.

SUNDAY, 19 DECEMBER 1943
29 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands and Baker Island bomb barracks, hangars, and wharf areas on Mille Atoll and Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands they claim 7 fighters shot down. P-39's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands strafe Mille Atoll , destroying 3 airplanes and firing an oil dump 2 P-39's are lost.

MONDAY, 20 DECEMBER 1943
16 B-24's flying out of Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands and Baker Island bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands 3 B-24's are shot down they claim 8 fighters destroyed.

TUESDAY, 21 DECEMBER 1943
8 B-24's from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands escort 4 USN PB4Y's on a photo mission over Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The B-24's bomb shipping and aircraft landing grounds and other facilities at Roi, Ennuebing, and Kwajalein Islands in the Marshall Islands. A-24's, along with USN and US Marine Corps (USMC) aircraft, hit shipping and airfields at Emidj Island in the Marshall Islands. 16 P-39's strafe fuel dumps, shipping, and AA at Mille Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 22 DECEMBER 1943
11 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands dive-bomb cargo ships in Mille Atoll lagoon in the Caroline Islands escort is provided by 32 P-39's and USN F6F's the P-39's strafe the ship and AA and gasoline dumps on the island and the vessel is left burning.

THURSDAY, 23 DECEMBER 1943
19 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands from Nanumea Island in the Ellice Islands, bomb Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands 9 others, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls in the Marshall Islands. 10 A-24's, escorted by 20 P-39's, attack Mille Atoll , hitting shore installations and a cargo vessel (wrecked by the previous day's raid) in the lagoon.

FRIDAY, 24 DECEMBER 1943
18 B-24's, staging through the Gilbert Islands from the Ellice Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

SATURDAY, 25 DECEMBER 1943
10 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, supported by P-39's, attack Mille Atoll , hitting the runway, ammunition storage, and an AA position.

SUNDAY, 26 DECEMBER 1943
16 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands. P-39's fly reconnaissance and strafing missions over Mille Atoll .

TUESDAY, 28 DECEMBER 1943
15 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands and Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, staging through Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands and Baker Island, hit Maloelap and Majuro Atolls in the Marshall Islands and Mille Atoll . 18 A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, with an escort of 20 P-39's, attack Mille Atoll this attack is followed by another against the atoll carried out by 9 B-25's from Tarawa, supported by 12 Makin-based P-39's.

THURSDAY, 30 DECEMBER 1943
17 B-24's, flying from Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, bomb Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands and 9 B-25's from Tarawa hit the town of Jabor on Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands. A-24's from Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands, escorted by 24 P-39's, dive-bomb gun positions on Mille Atoll.

SATURDAY, 1 JANUARY 1944
16 P-39's strafe the harbor of Mille Atoll in the Marshall Islands and attack shipping N of the atoll 2 small vessels are heavily damaged. During the month of Jan 44, HQ VII Bomber Command transfers from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice Islands to Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.

SUNDAY, 2 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll 9 B-25's hit targets on Jaluit Atoll and P-39's strafe shipping at Mille Atoll.

MONDAY, 3 JANUARY 1944
24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb AA positions and radar and radio facilities on Mille Atoll. 20 supporting P-39's strafe runways and oil storage.

TUESDAY, 4 JANUARY 1944
18 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb Emidj Island, Marshall Islands.

SATURDAY, 8 JANUARY 1944
15 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb shipping and shore installations at several locations on Wotje, Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, Marshall Islands and 2 B-25's from Tarawa hit shipping and gun positions on Jaluit.

MONDAY, 10 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 4 P-39's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands strafe Mille Atoll 1 of the P-39's drops 2 500-lb (227 kg) bombs on the fuel storage area during the night of 10/11 Jan, 16 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands from the Ellice Islands, bomb Maloelap Atoll 4 others, staging through Baker Island from Canton Island, Phoenix Islands, hit Mille Atoll.

TUESDAY, 11 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands hit 5 vessels and land installations at Maloelap Atoll a 5000-ton cargo ship and a small vessel are sunk 4 P-39's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb and strafe runways on Mille Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 12 JANUARY 1944
21 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb AA positions and the storage area on Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands and 20 supporting P-39's strafe runways.

THURSDAY, 13 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands attack harbor shipping at Wotje Atoll 21 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands dive-bomb dock, barracks, and storage area on Mille Atoll some of the 16 escorting P-39's strafe ground targets, and 10 other P-39's carry out strafing mission over Mille Atoll.

FRIDAY, 14 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 12 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb 3 islands in Kwajalein Atoll 3 B-25's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands fly a mission against shipping at Wotje Atoll 2 of the B-25's attack 2 small vessels, sinking 1 and damaging the other the other B-25 bombs a runway and building on the S part of Wotje.

SATURDAY, 15 JANUARY 1944
9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands flying at deck-level bomb and strafe shipping and shore installations at Maloelap Atoll, Marshall Islands 2 vessels are hit and the oil dump, hangars, other buildings, and runways are damaged 1 B-25 crashes at sea after being hit by AA fire.

SUNDAY, 16 JANUARY 1944
25 A-24's, 16 P-39's, and 8 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands strike Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands the A-24's bomb and strafe AA positions and storage areas, the P-40's bomb and strafe barracks and AA emplacements and the P-39's strafe runways 2 P-39's are lost P-39's sent up on interceptor missions claim 3 Japanese airplanes destroyed over Mille Atoll and Makin Island.

MONDAY, 17 JANUARY 1944
9 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb and strafe Mille Atoll hitting the runway, AA positions, radio tower, warehouse area, lagoon dredges and possible oil dumps. 4 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb and strafe the Mille Atoll landing ground.

TUESDAY, 18 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 12 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, attack barracks area, runway and gun position on the N part of Mille Atoll 25 A-24's and 8 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands pound the oil storage area on the S side of Jabor Island in Jaluit Atoll the P-40's also strafe a radio station in the target area.

WEDNESDAY, 19 JANUARY 1944
17 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands flying at low altitude, the B-25's score hits on gun positions, fuel dumps, and the airfield area in general AA fire claims 2 B-25's.

THURSDAY, 20 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 13 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Wotje Atoll during the night of 19/20 Jan 8 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, bomb Rakaaru Island other B-25's sent from Tarawa Atoll against shipping at Ailinglapalap Atoll, abort because of bad weather 9 P-40's from the Gilbert Islands strafe a corvette and a schooner at Jaluit Atoll, mortally damaging both vessels 4 other P-40's bomb Mille Atoll.

FRIDAY, 21 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 16 B-24's staging through Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands during the night of 20/21 Jan, bomb targets on Kwajalein Atoll 6 Tarawa-based B-25's hit Arno Atoll, and 12 bomb Aur Atoll 9 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, hit gun positions, barracks, and runways on Mille Atoll 23 A-24's and 11 P-40's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, attack gun positions, ammunition and oil storage, barracks, and 2 small vessels at Jaluit Atoll.

SATURDAY, 22 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 18 B-24's, flying from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit targets on Kwajalein, Jaluit and Mille Atoll 10 B-25's from Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands hit Maloelap Atoll 9 others, flying out of Tarawa, bomb shipping and shore installations at Wotje Atoll 3 B-25's are lost during the day's missions 10 Japanese aircraft are claimed shot down.

SUNDAY, 23 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 21 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands, hit Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll the B-25's claim 3 fighters shot down 23 B-24's, flying out of Makin and Abemama Islands, Gilbert Islands, bomb Wotje Atoll at dusk 1 B-24 bombs Mille Atoll during return flight after developing engine trouble.

MONDAY, 24 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, supported by 12 P-39's and 7 P-40's, hit gun positions, storage areas, and barracks on Mille Atoll. In the late afternoon, 8 B-25's, staging through Makin Island, bomb the airfield on Wotje Atoll. During the night of 24/25 Jan, 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, and 12 B-24's from the Ellice Islands, bomb several targets in Maloelap Atoll. 1 other B-24 bombs Mille Atoll.

TUESDAY, 25 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 24 A-24's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, supported by 12 P-39's, attack gun positions on Mille Atoll 8 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, bomb a vessel and shore targets at Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll later, in a dusk attack, 18 B-24's flying out of the Gilbert Islands bomb Kwajalein Atoll, hitting runways and AA positions.

WEDNESDAY, 26 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 9 B-25's from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands, hit several targets in Maloelap Atoll about 20 fighters attack the formation 12 P-40's, meeting the returning B-25's over Aur Atoll, join the battle against the fighters, claiming 10+ destroyed the B-25's claim 5 shot down several more are destroyed on the ground or while taking off during the bombing raid. 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands hit Aineman Island in Jaluit Atoll, and nearby shipping.

THURSDAY, 27 JANUARY 1944
In the Gilbert Islands, 6 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll hit Nauru Island, and 9 staging through Makin Island hit Wotje Atoll, Marshall Islands 23 A-24's, supported by 10 P-39's, pound Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands and 7 B-24's, staging through Makin Island, bomb Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll in a dusk attack.

FRIDAY, 28 JANUARY 1944
AAF aircraft from the Gilbert Islands bomb the Marshall Islands, i.e., 9 B-25's, staging through Makin Island bomb Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island and taking off at varying intervals, carry out several hours of strikes against Wotje, Kwajalein, Maloelap, and Jaluit Atolls.

SATURDAY, 29 JANUARY 1944
As a US invasion force approaches the Marshall Islands, B-24's, attacking from bases in the Gilbert Islands, maintain day and night attacks (both multiple-plane missions and single-plane attacks at intervals) against Maloelap, Jaluit, Aur, Wotje, and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands. 9 B-25's from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, also carry out a strike against shipping and shore installations at Wotje. 18 A-24's, supported by 12 P-40's, hit Jaluit. 12 P-39's, operating in flights of 4 aircraft, patrol and strafe Mille all day to deny the use of the airfield to the enemy.

SUNDAY, 30 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, P-40's and P-39's maintain patrols over Mille Atoll, bombing and strafing the airfield to prevent its use by the enemy against invading US forces B-24's maintain all-night strikes against Kwajalein Atoll in preparation for the invasion the following morning the invasion of Majuro Atoll begins during the night of 30/31 Jan.

MONDAY, 31 JANUARY 1944
In the Marshall Islands as US Army and USMC troops land on Kwajalein Atoll, under overall command of Admiral Raymond A Spruance, the USAAF hits other atolls. 19 A-24's bomb Mille Atoll airfield, over which P-39's and P-40's maintain all-day cover and harassment 9 P-40's carry out a strafing mission against Jaluit Atoll during the night of 31 Jan/1 Feb, 8 B-24's, attacking at intervals, bomb Wotje Atoll.

MONDAY, 1 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands hit the beach defenses on Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands P-40s on armed reconnaissance over Mille Atoll, Marshall Islands strafe a beached schooner. Operation CATCHPOLE (operations against Eniwetok and Ujelang Atolls in the Marshall Islands) is begun to occupy and defend Eniwetok Atoll, which is to furnish a striking base for operations against the Marianas Islands. During the operation, Seventh Air Force aircraft operating from newly acquired bases in the Gilbert and Marshall Islands neutralize airfields in the Marianas and continue to pound by-passed airfields in the Marshalls.

WEDNESDAY, 2 FEBRUARY 1944
A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island bomb runways and gun positions on Mille Atoll and along with P-39 escort strafe NE tip of the island B-24s from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands bomb Rongelap Island, Marshall Islands.

THURSDAY, 3 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island, bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.

FRIDAY, 4 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s, flying from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island, bomb Wotje, Maloelap and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands B-25s from Tarawa and Abemama Island, Gilbert Islands also hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls P-40s based on Makin Island bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.

SATURDAY, 5 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island dive- bomb and strafe oil storage area, radio facilities, and small craft at Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands P-39s strafe runways on Mille Atoll.

SUNDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap and Wotje Atolls A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island attack Mille Atoll Tarawa-based P-39s strafe Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 7 FEBRUARY 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls and P-40s from Makin Island hit a storage area at Jaluit Atoll.

TUESDAY, 8 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Makin and Abemama Islands hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls.

WEDNESDAY, 9 FEBRUARY 1944
A-24s from Makin Island along with supporting P-40s, bomb and strafe oil storage and gun positions on Jaluit Atoll during a dusk-to-dawn operation on 9/10 Feb B-24s operating at intervals from Tarawa Atoll maintain strikes against Wotje Atoll and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll.

THURSDAY, 10 FEBRUARY 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls 9 B-24s from Abemama Island, sent to bomb a weather and radio station on Rongelap Island, abort due to a fuel leak in the lead B-24 an attempt to bomb Jaluit Atoll during the return flight is unsuccessful.

FRIDAY, 11 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s and P-39s dive-bomb and strafe hangar, airfield installations and gun positions on Mille Atoll.

SATURDAY, 12 FEBRUARY 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls A-24s and P-39s from Makin Island bomb and strafe Mille Atoll.

SUNDAY, 13 FEBRUARY 1944
During the night of 13/14 Feb, B-24s from Tarawa Atoll operating individually at intervals, bomb Wotje and Mille Atolls and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll.

MONDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 1944
40+ B-24s from the 11th and 90th Bombardment Groups (Heavy), flying out of Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll strike Ponape Island in the first Seventh Air Force raid on the Caroline Islands 2 of the B-24s hit the alternate target of Emidj Island.

TUESDAY, 15 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island pound Mille Atoll and Ponape Island 10 P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways and a disabled vessel at Mille Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 16 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll and Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll P-40s from Makin Island fly 2 bombing-strafing strikes against Jaluit Atoll A-24s bomb Mille Atoll.

THURSDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands, and Jaluit Atoll. P-40s strafe floatplanes off Emidj Island, as a USN Task Force begins a heavy attack on Truk Atoll.

FRIDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe Jaluit and Mille Atolls. US forces land on Engebi Island in Eniwetok Atoll.

SATURDAY, 19 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Makin Island pound Ponape and Kusaie Islands B-25s from Tarawa hit Wotje Atoll while Makin-based P-40s bomb and strafe Mille Atoll. US forces land on Eniwetok Island in Eniwetok Atoll.

SUNDAY, 20 FEBRUARY 1944
9 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb the airfield at Wotje Atoll P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb runways and small vessels at Mille Atoll.

MONDAY, 21 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands and Jaluit Atoll. B-25s from Abemama bomb Maloelap Atoll. P-40s from Makin Island hit Mille Atoll. US forces gain complete control of Eniwetok Island in Eniwetok Atoll. 9th Troop Carrier Squadron, Seventh Air Force, arrives at Hickam Field, Territory of Hawaii from the US with C-47s.

TUESDAY, 22 FEBRUARY 1944
1 B-24 bombs Kusaie Island. 8 A-24s and 9 P-40s from Makin Island bomb Mille Atoll 1 P-40 launches rockets against airfield targets in the first such attack by a Seventh Air Force aircraft.

WEDNESDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island bomb Mille Atoll 2 small boats are destroyed by strafing B-25s from Abemama Island hit Taroa Island in Maloelap Atoll. B-24s from Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Kusaie and Ponape Islands and Jaluit Atoll.

THURSDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb the runway and radio installation on Mille Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield on Wotje Atoll.

FRIDAY, 25 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s out of Makin Island bomb and strafe targets at Jaluit Atoll B-25's from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island hit Mille and Wotje Atolls B-24s from Abemama and Tarawa pound Ponape Island.

SATURDAY, 26 FEBRUARY 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island attack Wotje and Jaluit Atolls P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe targets on Mille Atoll. 27th and 38th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), based on Nanumea Island, Ellice Islands begin operating from Abemama and Makin Islands, respectively, with B-24s.

SUNDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 1944
A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island pound Jaluit and Mille Atolls, while B-25s from Abemama Island hit Wotje and Mille Atolls B-24s from Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Ponape Island.

MONDAY, 28 FEBRUARY 1944
P-40s from Makin Island strafe and bomb the runway and radio installation on Mille Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield on Wotje Atoll.

TUESDAY, 29 FEBRUARY 1944
B-24s bomb Maloelap, Mille and Wotje Atolls B-25s hit Jaluit and Mille Atolls P-40s attack Mille Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 1 MARCH 1944
B-25s pound Maloelap Atoll

THURSDAY, 2 MARCH 1944
B-25s bomb Maloelap Atoll.

FRIDAY, 3 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, hit Maloelap Atoll.

SATURDAY, 4 MARCH 1944
P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways at Mille Atoll. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb airfield installations and runways in Wotje Atoll.

SUNDAY, 5 MARCH 1944
The Seventh Air Force continues to hit the Marshall and Caroline Islands P-40s from Makin Island carry out fighter-bomber mission against runways and airfield installations at Mille Atoll B-25s hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls B-24s bomb Ponape Island and last resort targets at Kusaie Island and Mille Atoll.

MONDAY, 6 MARCH 1944
A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island bomb and strafe runways at Mille Atoll. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll pound the airfield at Wotje Atoll.

TUESDAY, 7 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Abemama Island Jaluit Atoll. P-40s bomb and strafe the airfield at Mille Atoll. B-25s pound runways, AA positions, storage areas, and barracks on Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 8 MARCH 1944
A-24s and P-40s, from Makin Island, bomb and strafe runways and AA positions at Mille Atoll. Tarawa Atoll-based B-25s pound Wotje Atoll.

THURSDAY, 9 MARCH 1944
B-25s based on Abemama Island attack Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll. B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Ponape and Kusaie Islands.

FRIDAY, 10 MARCH 1944
A-24s and P-40s from Makin Island and B-25s from Tarawa Atoll attack airfields, AA positions and radio installations at Mille and Wotje Atolls. B-25s, operating out of Engebi Island in Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands (secured by invading forces on 22 Feb) for the first time, bomb Kusaie Island.

SATURDAY, 11 MARCH 1944
B-24s, operating out of Kwajalein Atoll, for first time, carry out the Seventh's first raid from the Marshall Islands against Wake Island. P-40s and B-25s, operating from bases in the Gilbert Islands, pound Mille and Maloelap Atolls.

SUNDAY, 12 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Mille, Wotje and Maloelap Atolls and Nauru Island, Gilbert Islands. B-25s hit Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 13 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Kusaie Island. B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll pound Mille Atoll. 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Nanumea Island, Ellice Islands to Kwajalein Atoll the squadron continues operating from Makin Island with B-24s until 22 Mar.

TUESDAY, 14 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Kusaie Island. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 15 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll fly the first Seventh Air Force mission against Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, hitting Dublon and Eten Islands before dawn alternate targets of Oroluk Anchorage and Ponape Town are also hit. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll. By this date the A-24s, P-39s, and P-40s used against Mille and Jaluit Atolls during Operations FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls) and CATCHPOLE (operations against Eniwetok and Ujelang Atolls) have returned to Oahu, Territory of Hawaii for rest and re-equipment. 27th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Nanumea Island to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s they have been operating from Abemama Island since 26 Feb.

THURSDAY, 16 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll and Abemama Island pound Wotje and Mille Atolls and Ormed Island, Wotje Atoll.

FRIDAY, 17 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll Atoll. 392d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Abemama Island to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.

SATURDAY, 18 MARCH 1944
2 B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb and strafe Ponape Island. 13 B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit Atoll while 5 from Tarawa Atoll hit the Atoll with bombs and cannon fire. 1 B-24 from Tarawa Atoll bombs Mille Atoll and photographs Mille and Majuro Atoll.

SUNDAY, 19 MARCH 1944
B-24s pound Wake Island from Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap, Jaluit, and Mille Atolls. 1 B-24 from Tarawa bombs Mille and photographs Mille and Majuro Atolls.

MONDAY, 20 MARCH 1944
12 B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb the radio station and pier on Emidj Island, Marshall Islands. 1 other B-25 from Tarawa bombs Mille Atoll, rearms at Majuro Atoll, and again bombs Mille on the return trip. HQ 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) moves from Abemama Island to Kwajalein Atoll.

TUESDAY, 21 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Mille and Maloelap Atolls and Ponape Island. Tarawa-based B-25s also pound Maloelap Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll bomb Mille and Jaluit Atolls. 38th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy), ceases operating from Makin Island and returns to base on Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island B-25s flying out of Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island and Tarawa Atoll-based B-25s strike Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, commencing a series of B-25 shuttle-missions between Tarawa or Makin Island and the USN's new base at Majuro Atoll which is used as the rearming base for the return strike.

FRIDAY, 24 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit while others, flying out of Eniwetok Atoll, hit Ponape Island and Ant Island, Caroline Islands.

SATURDAY, 25 MARCH 1944
Advanced HQ Seventh Air Force in Tarawa Atoll is disbanded and the Seventh's operations in the C Pacific forward area are placed under the VII Bomber Command at Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll pound Ponape Island and claim 4 fighters shot down. B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Maloelap Atoll. HQ VII Bomber Command moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll.

SUNDAY, 26 MARCH 1944
Eniwetok Atoll-based B-25s strike Ponape Island B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Jaluit again on the return flight to Tarawa.

MONDAY, 27 MARCH 1944
B-25s and B-24s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap, Mille and Wotje Atolls B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll and strafe and cannonade Ponape Island and a single B-24 from Tarawa Atoll bombs Jabor in Jaluit Atoll.

TUESDAY, 28 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Abemama Island and Tarawa Atoll pound Jaluit, Mille and Maloelap Atolls a single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, en route to Eniwetok Atoll, bombs Rongelap Atoll, Marshall Islands and B-24s, flying a night mission from Kwajalein, bomb targets at Truk Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 29 MARCH 1944
B-25s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Jaluit and Rongelap Atolls B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island while others from Tarawa Atoll bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.

THURSDAY, 30 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein and Eniwetok Atolls hit Truk Atoll before dawn. B-25s from Kwajalein and Tarawa Atolls strike Wotje, Mille, Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.

FRIDAY, 31 MARCH 1944
B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll in a predawn mission. B-25s from Eniwetok hit Ponape Island while others, flying out of Tarawa Atoll, pound Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls. 431st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.

SATURDAY, 1 APRIL 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands hit Truk.

SUNDAY, 2 APRIL 1944
B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands hit Truk Atoll during the night of 1/2 Apr. During the day B-25s bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.

MONDAY, 3 APRIL 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll during the night of 2/3 Apr, bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Abemama and Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls. 98th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Eniwetok Atoll with B-24s.

TUESDAY, 4 APRIL 1944
B-25s bomb s and Maloelap Atolls.

WEDNESDAY, 5 APRIL 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, bomb up again at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, and hit Jaluit Atoll during the return trip. HQ 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy) moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll.

THURSDAY, 6 APRIL 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island. B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island twice. B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Maloelap Atoll during the return flight.

FRIDAY, 7 APRIL 1944
B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and bomb Jaluit Atoll on the return flight.

SATURDAY, 8 APRIL 1944
B-24s flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll hit Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and bomb Jaluit Atoll during the return flight.

SUNDAY, 9 APRIL 1944
B-24s on a photo reconnaissance mission over Maloelap, Wotje, and Mille Atolls, Marshall Islands, and a single Tarawa Atoll-based B-25 bombs Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll B-25s, in a shuttle mission from Abemama Island, bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and then hit Maloelap Atoll.

MONDAY, 10 APRIL 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll (1 hits Ponape Island) while B-25s, based on Abemama Island, strike Ponape. B-25s, flying a shuttle mission between Tarawa and Majuro Atolls, pound Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.

TUESDAY, 11 APRIL 1944
B-25s from the Gilbert Islands hit Ponape Island, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and carry out a shuttle mission against Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.

WEDNESDAY, 12 APRIL 1944
B-25s, flying out of Abemama Island, bomb Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll, and hit Jaluit Atoll on the return trip.

THURSDAY, 13 APRIL 1944
B-24s out of Eniwetok Atoll strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Tarawa Atoll bomb Jaluit Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and hit Maloelap Atoll.

FRIDAY, 14 APRIL 1944
PACIFIC OCEAN AREA (POA, Seventh Air Force): A single B-24, enroute from Kwajalein Atoll to Tarawa Atoll, bombs Jaluit Atoll B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island while B-25s from Abemama Island strike Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as an arming station between strikes Japanese bombers carry out an ineffective raid on Eniwetok Atoll. 26th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 11th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moves from Tarawa Atoll to Kwajalein Atoll with B-24s.

SATURDAY, 15 APRIL 1944
B-25s, based on Tarawa Atoll, bomb Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and hit Jaluit and Mille Atolls on the return trip.

SUNDAY, 16 APRIL 1944
B-25s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll B-25s from Abemama Island hit Maloelap and Mille Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between the strikes.

MONDAY, 17 APRIL 1944
B-25s, based on Tarawa Atoll, strike Maloelap and Mille Atolls, rearming at Majuro Atoll between the raids.

TUESDAY, 18 APRIL 1944
First Seventh Air Force attack on the Marianas Islands takes place as B-24s escorting USN aircraft on a photographic reconnaissance mission from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Saipan Island. Other B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll. B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island after failing to find shipping reported in the area and B-25s from Abemama Island bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes.

WEDNESDAY, 19 APRIL 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 20 APRIL 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll search the area near Wake Island for shipping finding none, the bombers hit Wake and Peale Islands. Tarawa Atoll based B-25s, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes, bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls.

FRIDAY, 21 APRIL 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll. B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll, staging through Kwajalein, bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Ponape Island. Abemama Island-based B-25s, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base, bomb Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.

SATURDAY, 22 APRIL 1944
During the night of 21/22 Apr, B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll other B-24s from Kwajalein follow with another raid on Wotje during the day. B-25s from Tarawa Atoll, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming, bomb Jaluit, Maloelap and Mille Atolls.

SUNDAY, 23 APRIL 1944
B-24s based at Kwajalein Atoll hit Truk and Wotje Atolls. Makin Island-based B-25s hit Ponape Island and Jaluit and Maloelap Atolls.

MONDAY, 24 APRIL 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Ponape Island while others, based on Makin Island, hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.

TUESDAY, 25 APRIL 1944
Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s, during the night of 24/25 Apr, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Guam Island, Marianas Islands and Truk Atoll, and during the day hit Wotje and Maloelap Atolls. This is the first AAF mission against Guam. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island, and Makin Island-based B-25s hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.

WEDNESDAY, 26 APRIL 1944
B-24s, having landed at Los Negros Island after bombing Guam Island on 25 Apr, hit Ponape Island and return to Kwajalein Atoll. B-25s based on Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.

THURSDAY, 27 APRIL 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 26/27 Apr. B-25s from Eniwetok follow up during the day with 3 raids on Ponape Island Makin Island-based B-25s hit Jaluit, Wotje and Mille Atolls. 1 B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, using Makin Island as a rearming base, bombs Jabor and Emidj and Enybor Islands, Jaluit Atoll.

FRIDAY, 28 APRIL 1944
B-25s, based on Makin Island, strike Jaluit and Mille Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes. A single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll bombs islands in Jaluit Atoll, hitting Emidj first, then rearming at Makin Island, and attacking Jabor and Enybor during the return flight.

SATURDAY, 29 APRIL 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk and Jaluit Atolls. B-25s from Makin Island also hit Jaluit Atoll .

SUNDAY, 30 APRIL 1944
41 Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s bomb various targets at Wake Island. 11 Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit Atoll while 8 from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll bomb Ponape Island.

MONDAY, 1 MAY 1944
B-25s from Makin Island, Gilbert Islands bomb Jaluit Atoll.

TUESDAY, 2 MAY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, during the night. During the day B-25s based on Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, Marshall Islands, using Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands as a shuttle base to rearm between strikes. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll pound Ponape Island, Caroline Islands.

WEDNESDAY, 3 MAY 1944
B-25s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll while others, based at Makin Island, strike both Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between raids.

THURSDAY, 4 MAY 1944
12 B-25s, based at Makin Island, pound Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming between the strikes. 39 B-24s from Kwajalein and Eniwetok Atolls hit Ponape Island.

FRIDAY, 5 MAY 1944
During the night of 4/5 MAY B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll stage through Eniwetok Atoll and bomb Truk Atoll. During the day B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island, and 10 from Makin Island hit Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, Marshall Islands, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming base between the attacks.

SATURDAY, 6 MAY 1944
B-25s from Makin Island and Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje and Jaluit Atolls. B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, escort USN aircraft on a photo reconnaissance of Guam Island, Marianas Islands. The B-24s bomb Guam from 20,000 ft (6,096 m), scoring hits on 2 airfields and a town area and proceed to Los Negros Island, Admiralty Islands to prepare for the return flight the B-24s claim 4 enemy aircraft shot down.

SUNDAY, 7 MAY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 6/7 May. B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island during the following day. Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.

MONDAY, 8 MAY 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island strike Ponape Island while Makin Island-based B-25s pound Jaluit and Wotje Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base between strikes. B-24s that landed at Los Negros Island after the strike on Guam Island on 6 MAY return to the Marshall Islands, bombing Ponape Island en route.

TUESDAY, 9 MAY 1944
During the night of 8/9 MAY B-24s stage through Kwajalein Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll. Makin Island-based B-25s hit Wotje and Jaluit Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a rearming point between attacks.

WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island during the night of 9/10 May. During the DAY, B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island while Makin Island-based B-25s raid Jaluit and Wotje Atolls.

THURSDAY, 11 MAY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the night of 10/11 May. During the day B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island while others, based on Makin Island, pound Jaluit Atoll.

FRIDAY, 12 MAY 1944
A single B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll bombs Jaluit Atoll.

SATURDAY, 13 MAY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll during the early morning hours. Other B-24s from Kwajalein bomb Maloelap and Jaluit Atolls, Marshall Islands. B-25s from Engebi Island hit Ponape Island.

SUNDAY, 14 MAY 1944
53 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll and 43 B-25s from Makin Island join USN aircraft in pounding Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 15 MAY 1944
Operations are limited to photo reconnaissance of Jaluit Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll.

TUESDAY, 16 MAY 1944
Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s pound Wake Island.

WEDNESDAY, 17 MAY 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wake Island while Engebi Island-based B-25s hit Ponape Island.

B-25s based on Makin Island bomb Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll, rearm at Majuro Atoll and attack the same target during the return flight to base.

FRIDAY, 19 MAY 1944
B-25s based on Engebi Island hit Ponape Island and B-25s from Makin Island hit Nanru Island.

SATURDAY, 20 MAY 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.

SUNDAY, 21 MAY 1944
53 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb various targets in Wotje Atoll 41 B-25s, based on Makin Island, follow up with bombing, cannonading and strafing attack on the atoll. 8 B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Rota Island, Marianas Islands, and rearm at Los Negros Island.

MONDAY, 22 MAY 1944
8 B-25s based on Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island. Weather cancels other strikes.

TUESDAY, 23 MAY 1944
Makin Island-based B-25s strike Jaluit Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 24 MAY 1944
B-25s from Makin Island pound Wotje and Jaluit Atolls, using Majuro Atoll as a shuttle base for rearming between the strikes. B-25s based at Engebi Island hit Ponape Island.

THURSDAY, 25 MAY 1944
B-25s flying out of Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.

FRIDAY, 26 MAY 1944
45 B-25s, flying out of Makin Island, attack Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll. 9 B-25s from Engebi Island fly a successful search mission for a downed B-25 crew in the vicinity of Ponape and Pakin Islands, Caroline Islands after locating the survivors, later picked up by USN destroyer, the B-25s attack Pakin and Ponape Islands with cannon and machinegun fire.

SATURDAY, 27 MAY 1944
24 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll and 52 B-25s from Engebi Island pound Ponape Island.

SUNDAY, 28 MAY 1944
29 B-25s stage from Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Jaluit Atoll, and land at Makin Island. B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Saipan and Guam Islands, Marianas Islands those bombing Guam turn south to Los Negros Island to rearm while the others return to Eniwetok. B-25s flying from Engebi Island bomb Mille Atoll. B-24s escort USN photo planes over the Marianas Islands.

MONDAY, 29 MAY 1944
Operations are restricted to photo missions over Wotje, Mille, and Jaluit Atolls.

TUESDAY, 30 MAY 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island, which is also hit by B-24s returning from the shuttle base on Los Negros Island. 2 forces of B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll strike Truk Atoll and Wake Island.

THURSDAY, 1 JUNE 1944
B-25s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Ponape Island, Caroline Islands.

SATURDAY, 3 JUNE 1944
B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll in a pre-dawn raid B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Nauru Island.

SUNDAY, 4 JUNE 1944
During the night B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, hit Truk Atoll B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, follow with a daylight raid on Ponape Island.

MONDAY, 5 JUNE 1944
B-25s from Makin Island, hit Nauru Island B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll escort photo aircraft over Guam Island, Marianas Islands, bomb the island, and proceed to Los Negros Island for rearming. B-25s from Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll strike Ponape Island.

TUESDAY, 6 JUNE 1944
B-24s returning to Eniwetok Atoll from Los Negros Island (where they rearmed after bombing Guam Island the previous day) hit Ponape Island.

THURSDAY, 8 JUNE 1944
During the night of 7/8 Jun, B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll and Ponape Island. B-25s from Makin Island follow up during the day with a strike against Nauru Island.

FRIDAY, 9 JUNE 1944
During the night of 8/9 Jun B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Atoll.

SATURDAY, 10 JUNE 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll and Ponape Island during the night of 9/10 Jun. B-25s from Makin Island hit Nauru Island during the day.

SUNDAY, 11 JUNE 1944
B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll during the night of 11/12 Jun. B-25s follow with a raid against Ponape Island during the morning.

MONDAY, 12 JUNE 1944
Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s hit Truk Atoll during the night of 11/12 Jun and again during the day.

TUESDAY, 13 JUNE 1944
An attack during the night of 12/13 Jun by B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll against Truk Atoll and Ponape Island is followed by a daylight attack by Makin Island-based B-25s against Nauru and Ponape Islands.

SATURDAY, 17 JUNE 1944
B-24s, flying from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Ponape Island.

SUNDAY, 18 JUNE 1944
B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll.

MONDAY, 19 JUNE 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, strike Truk Atoll. B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll pound Ponape Island.

TUESDAY, 20 JUNE 1944
Kwajalein Atoll based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.

WEDNESDAY 21 JUNE 1944
B-24s based on Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 22 JUNE 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll from Kwajalein Atoll, hit Truk Atoll 1 bombs Ponape Island.

FRIDAY, 23 JUNE 1944
Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s strike Truk Atoll. B-25s from Engebi Island pound Ponape Island. During the evening, B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll also attack Ponape Island.

SUNDAY, 25 JUNE 1944
B-24s based on Kwajelein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.

TUESDAY, 27 JUNE 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 29 JUNE 1944
B-24s, staging, through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll .

FRIDAY, 30 JUNE 1944
Detachment of 28th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Seventh Air Force (attached to VII Fighter Command), based at Kipapa Airfield, Territory of Hawaii, begins operating from Kwajalein Atoll with F-5s.

SATURDAY, 1 JULY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll hit Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, during the night of 1/2 Jul and follow up with another raid during the day.

MONDAY, 3 JULY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.

TUESDAY, 4 JULY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.

SATURDAY, 8 JULY 1944
During the night of 7/8 Jul B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll and bomb Truk Atoll more B-24s follow with another raid during the day.

SUNDAY, 9 JULY 1944
Makin Island-based B-25s bomb Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 10 JULY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll during the night of 9/10 Jul and again during the day.

WEDNESDAY, 12 JULY 1944
During the night of 11/12 Jul B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Truk Atoll during the day B-24s hit Truk Atoll again.

THURSDAY, 13 JULY 1944
Kwajalein-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s from Makin Island pound Nauru Island.

SATURDAY, 15 JULY 1944
B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, hit Truk Atoll.

MONDAY, 17 JULY 1944
48 B-25s from Makin Island stage through Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll to bomb Ponape Island 47 of the B-25s (1 aborts) attack airfield facilities, AA positions, and other targets throughout the island.

TUESDAY, 18 JULY 1944
In the Marshall Islands, 5 B-24s, flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, hit Wotje Atoll. 25 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, attack Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 20 JULY 1944
P-47s pound Tinian Island. B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.

FRIDAY, 21 JULY 1944
P-47s attack enemy forces on Tinian Island. 28 B-24s, staging through Eniwetok Atoll, pound Truk Atoll.

SUNDAY, 23 JULY 1944
B-24s staging through Eniwetok Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll while others, flying out of Kwajalein Atoll, hit Wotje Atoll.

MONDAY, 24 JULY 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island bomb Ponape Island.

TUESDAY, 25 JULY 1944
B-24s, based at Kwajalein Atoll, bomb Truk Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 26 JULY 1944
B-25s from Engebi Island attack Ponape Island.

THURSDAY, 27 JULY 1944
B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll. B-25s based at Makin Island, hit Jaluit Atoll.

SUNDAY, 30 JULY 1944
BB-25s from Makin Island bomb Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 31 JULY 1944
B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 3 AUGUST 1944
B-24s from the Marshall Islands pound Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands.

FRIDAY, 4 AUGUST 1944
B-25s staging from the Marshall Island, hit Ponape Island. HQ 30th Bombardment Group (Heavy) and 27th, 38th and 392d Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy) move from Kwajalein Atoll to Saipan Island with B-24s.

SUNDAY, 6 AUGUST 1944
B-25s flying out of the Marshall Islands hit Ponape Island and B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll.

TUESDAY, 8 AUGUST 1944
B-25s from the Marshall Islands hit Ponape Island while B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.

THURSDAY, 10 AUGUST 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll hit Wotje Atoll.

SATURDAY, 12 AUGUST 1944
B-24s from the Marshall Islands bomb Truk Atoll .

MONDAY, 14 AUGUST 1944
From the Marshall Islands, B-25s hit Ponape Island and B-24s bomb Wotje Atoll. HQ VII Bomber Command moves from Kwajalein Atoll to Saipan Island.

WEDNESDAY, 16 AUGUST 1944
Marshall Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.

SUNDAY, 20 AUGUST 1944
Marshall Islands-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll.

TUESDAY, 22 AUGUST 1944
Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s hit Mille Atoll.

THURSDAY, 24 AUGUST 1944
Marshall Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Atoll while B-25s hit Nauru Island.

MONDAY, 28 AUGUST 1944
Marshall Islands-based B-24s hit Truk Atoll.

WEDNESDAY, 30 AUGUST 1944
Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s hit Mille Atoll.

FRIDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER 1944
Island-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.

SATURDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER 1944
Marshall Islands-based B-25s bomb Ponape Island, Caroline Islands and Nauru.

MONDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll strike Wotje Atoll.

FRIDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Wotje Atoll.

SUNDAY, 10 SEPTEMBER 1944
Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.

THURSDAY, 14 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll bomb Truk Island .

SATURDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s in the Marshall Islands bomb Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll.

MONDAY, 18 SEPTEMBER 1944
28 Eniwetok Atoll-based B-24s bomb Truk Island.

WEDNESDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s in the Marshall Islands hit Jaluit Atoll.

SATURDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 1944
On the night of 23/24 Sep a B-24 from Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands bombs Wake Island.

SUNDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 1944
26 B-24s from Kwajalein Atoll bomb Truk Island. The detachment of the 28th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Seventh AF, operating from Kwajalein Atoll with F-5s begins a movement to Peleliu Island.

MONDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 1944
During the night of 25/26 Sep Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24s stage through Eniwetok Atoll on a strike at shipping at Truk Island failing to locate the primary targets the B-24s bomb Tol, Eten, Param, and Moen Islands while others hit Wake Island during the night of 25/26 Sep.

TUESDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s from the Marshall Islands hit Wake Island during the night of 26/27 Sep.

WEDNESDAY, 27 SEPTEMBER 1944
14 Marshall Islands based B-24s strike Truk Island.

FRIDAY, 29 SEPTEMBER 1944
B-24s from Eniwetok Atoll pound Truk Island.

SATURDAY, 30 SEPTEMBER 1944
During the night of 30 Sep/1 Oct a Kwajalein Atoll-based B-24 bombs Wake Island.

4 OCTOBER 1944
B-24's from the Marshalls bomb A F at Moen.

6 OCTOBER 1944
A B-24 from Kwajalein bombs heavy gun battery on Emidj. During 6/7 Oct, 3 B-24's bomb Wake.

8 OCTOBER 1944
During the day and 8 9 Oct B-24's from the Marshalls bomb Wake.

9 OCTOBER 1944
25 B-25's from the Marshalls bomb Truk.

11 OCTOBER 1944
A Kwajalein-based B-24 bombs Wake during the night.

12 OCTOBER 1944
B-24's from Kwajalein bomb Wake during 12/13 Oct.

13 OCTOBER 1944
From the Marshalls B-24's pound Truk.

14 OCTOBER 1944
1 B-24 from the Marshalls bombs Wake during 14/15 Oct.

15 OCTOBER 1944
2 B-24's from the Marshalls bomb Wake on 15/16 Oct.


Newly discovered photo reignites Amelia Earhart conspiracy theory

Some experts say the image shows the pilot, her navigator Fred Noonan and her airplane in the Marshall Islands in 1937, when the archipelago was occupied by Japan – proving that she died in Japanese custody, rather than during a crash landing in the Pacific.

“When you pull out, and when you see the analysis that’s been done, I think it leaves no doubt to the viewers that that’s Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan,” Shawn Henry told NBC News. Henry is the former executive assistant director for the FBI and an NBC News analyst.

Kent Gibson, a forensic analyst who specializes in facial recognition, told the History Channel that it was “very likely” the individuals pictured are Earhart and Noonan, in a programme on the Earhart mystery scheduled to air this Sunday.

Not everyone is so convinced, however. “There is such an appetite for anything related to Amelia Earhart that even something this ridiculous will get everybody talking about it,” said Ric Gillespie, author of Finding Amelia and the executive director of the The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (Tighar).

“This is just a picture of a wharf at Jaluit [in the Marshall Islands], with a bunch of people,” Gillespie said. “It’s just silly. And this is coming from a guy who has spent the last 28 years doing genuine research into the Earhart disappearance and led 11 expeditions into the South Pacific.”

The picture was discovered by retired federal agent Les Kinney, who scoured the national archives for records that may have been overlooked in the now 80-year-old mystery of Earhart’s last flight.

Earhart and Noonan, with a map of the Pacific that shows the planned route of their last flight. Photograph: Bettmann archive

It was 2 July 1937, toward the end of her history-making flight around the world, when the nearly 40-year-old Earhart vanished somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. The crash has long been blamed on poor weather conditions and a technical failure with the plane’s radio system. Most historians believe that Earhart ran out of fuel, crashed into the Pacific Ocean and sunk to the ocean’s darkest depths.

But since no trace of Earhart, Noonan or her Lockheed Electra airplane have ever been confirmed, alternate theories have abounded for decades. This past November, another forensic breakthrough supported an alternate theory that Earhart may have died a castaway on an island in modern-day Kiribati.

Gillespie is an exponent of this account and believes there is copious evidence to support it, including the timing of radio transmissions received after the plane was no longer airborne, the location of human remains on the then uninhabited island, and items he and his team have recovered – including a popular US women’s moisturizer, a zipper from a jacket and a makeup case.

“We found the site, we’ve done three excavations there and we’re finding artifacts that speak of an American woman of the 1930s,” Gillespie said.


Japanese Blogger Points Out Timeline Flaw In Supposed Earhart Photo

A photograph of Jaluit Atoll was published in Umi no seimeisen : Waga nannyou no sugata, a photo book in Japan's national library. The book's publication date is listed as 1935. National Diet Library Digital Collections hide caption

A photograph of Jaluit Atoll was published in Umi no seimeisen : Waga nannyou no sugata, a photo book in Japan's national library. The book's publication date is listed as 1935.

A Japanese military history buff has found library records showing a photo supposedly depicting Amelia Earhart survived a crash landing in 1937 was actually published two years before the famous aviator vanished.

The photograph in question was featured in a History Channel special and received widespread media attention. Here's how NPR's Laurel Wamsley described the discovery of the image:

"A former U.S. Treasury agent named Les Kinney found the photo in a box of papers from the Office of Naval Intelligence while scouring for evidence regarding Earhart's disappearance that might have been overlooked. The undated photo was in a box marked 'declassified.' Its caption reads 'PL-Marshall Islands, Jaluit Atoll, Jaluit Island. Jaluit Harbor. ONI #14381.' "

In the History Channel special, some analysts argued that the photo showed Earhart (sitting at the end of the dock, facing away from the camera) and her navigator Fred Noonan (on the far left of the image). They identified the ship in the background as the Koshu Maru, and argued that the Koshu Maru rescued Earhart and Noonan after they crash-landed in 1937.

When the photo was found in the National Archives — without a date — it led some analysts to believe it depicted famed aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan. U.S. National Archives, courtesy Les Kinney hide caption

When the photo was found in the National Archives — without a date — it led some analysts to believe it depicted famed aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan.

U.S. National Archives, courtesy Les Kinney

But a Japanese military history blogger, who goes by @baron_yamaneko on Twitter, found evidence the photo predated Earhart's famous disappearance. The History Channel is aware of the evidence and says it is investigating.

In an English-language post, the blogger explains that "the photograph was first published in Palau under Japanese rule in 1935, in a photo book . So the photograph was taken at least two years before Amelia Earhart disappear[ed] in 1937 and a person on the photo was not her."

The Two-Way

Does A Newly Discovered Photo Show Amelia Earhart Survived A Crash Landing?

The photo book in question was digitized and published online by Japan's National Diet Library. The publication date is listed in the traditional Japanese style as "Showa 10" — that is, 1935.

The blogger also identifies the ship in the image as the Koshu, which the Japanese seized in World War I, rather than the Koshu Maru, which was launched in 1937.

The History Channel tells NPR it has "a team of investigators exploring the latest developments about Amelia Earhart and we will be transparent in our findings.

"Ultimately historical accuracy is most important to us and our viewers," spokeswoman Kirby Dixon said in a statement.


Does A Newly Discovered Photo Show Amelia Earhart Survived A Crash Landing?

A closer look at a recently unearthed photo shows a short-haired figure who could be aviator Amelia Earhart.

It has been 80 years since Amelia Earhart vanished while trying to become the first female pilot to fly around the world, and her 1937 disappearance has become one of the great mysteries of our time.

Now the makers of a new investigative special from the History Channel believe they have "the smoking gun" that answers the question of Earhart's disappearance aboard her Lockheed Electra once and for all: an old, cracked photograph found in the National Archives, showing a group of people on a dock in the Marshall Islands. Among the figures: two people who just might be Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan.

The show's experts say the short-haired person at the back is Earhart, and the man on the left with the receding hairline is Noonan. But the photo was taken from a distance, the man's face is in shadow and the person purported to be Earhart is turned away from the camera.

A former U.S. Treasury agent named Les Kinney found the photo in a box of papers from the Office of Naval Intelligence while scouring for evidence regarding Earhart's disappearance that might have been overlooked. The undated photo was in a box marked "declassified." Its caption reads "PL-Marshall Islands, Jaluit Atoll, Jaluit Island. Jaluit Harbor. ONI #14381."

"Kinney argues the photo must have been taken before 1943, as U.S. air forces conducted more than 30 bombing runs on Jaluit in 1943-44," according to a post on History.com. "He believes the plane on the barge is the Electra, and that two of the people on the dock are Earhart and Noonan. . Kent Gibson, another forensic analyst who specializes in facial recognition, said it was 'very likely' the individuals in it are Earhart and Noonan. Both analysts identified the ship in the photo as the Japanese military vessel Koshu Maru, which is thought to be the ship that took Earhart and Noonan away after their crash landing."

The experts interviewed for the special believe this photo lends powerful credence to the theory that when Earhart couldn't find Howland Island — her next refueling station — she turned back westward and landed on Mili Atoll. They think Earhart and Noonan were then rescued and taken to Jaluit Island, where there was a deepwater port.

An Earhart researcher named Richard Spink has taken many trips to the Marshall Islands and believes he has found parts of what was Earhart's plane on Mili Atoll. If indeed it's Earhart and Noonan in the photo, then they must have crash-landed in the Marshall Islands — and lived.

Earhart and Noonan may then have been taken to a Japanese prison on the island of Saipan, according to the special. But if Earhart and Noonan are bound for prison, why do they look so serene in the photograph?

"They obviously believe that they've been rescued," Gary Tarpinian, the show's executive producer, tells NPR. "However, the word came back from Tokyo that . we can't let her go. I'm not sure why. Did she see something she shouldn't have seen? Did they think she was spying? Who knows? We can only speculate. But somewhere between when she thought she was rescued and after that photo, she was held captive and she was brought to Saipan."

The photo is proof, he says, of what many people on the Marshall Islands have long held: Earhart and Noonan landed there and a Japanese boat called Koshu took them to Saipan. The special interviewed people from Saipan, including a woman Tarpinian says might be the last person alive who saw Earhart with her own eyes.

"She was a 12-year-old girl who never forgot what she saw, because she had never seen Caucasian people — she'd never seen Westerners," he says. "And she remarked to her mother, 'Do all the women in the West dress like men, with short hair and pants?' "

But Richard Gillespie, an Earhart expert who leads The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, isn't at all convinced the photograph depicts the aviator.

"This is just a picture of a wharf at Jaluit, with a bunch of people," he told The Guardian. "It's just silly."

Gillespie believes that Earhart died as a castaway on an island in what's now Kiribati, according to the newspaper. "We found the site, we've done three excavations there and we're finding artifacts that speak of an American woman of the 1930s," he said.

He says the person in the Jaluit photo has hair too long to be Earhart, who he says was photographed just days before, "and hair doesn't grow that fast."

National Archives communications director James Pritchett says the archives doesn't know when the photo was taken, who the photographer was, or what the "PL" in the caption means.

The archives posted the Jaluit photo to its website Thursday but isn't going to make a statement on whether the people in the photo are Earhart and Noonan, Pritchett says,

But even he is intrigued by the idea that it could be.

"I'm so fascinated by this myself," he says. "There are many discoveries that happen all the time. It's usually some really swift members of the public. . People here find things on a really regular basis. We have billions of records of all kinds."

Hear that, America? Get thee to the archives and solve some mysteries.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

FEATURED PODCAST

San Diego news when you want it, where you want it. Get local stories on politics, education, health, environment, the border and more. New episodes are ready weekday mornings. Hosted by Anica Colbert and produced by KPBS, San Diego and the Imperial County's NPR and PBS station.


Aerial Photo of Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands. - History

Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence Special Premieres Sun Jul 9 at 9/8c

How long can the US government continue a cover-up? Maybe 50 years?
Maybe 75 years? Maybe 80 years.
Newly discovered evidence suggests that Amelia Earhart did not die in a
plane crash, but was captured by the Japanese. Which neither the
Japanese government nor the US government ever admitted.
But real researchers from the History Channel kept digging and found
evidence that the US government overlooked, misfiled and forgot to
destroy. They originally classified it Top Secret and the destroyed it
lest its citizens stumble upon it some day. Why would they still keep
these secrets from 1937? It's what they do. Obviously the parallel is to
the cover-up of the JFK assassination, but there are are couple of other
interesting points that Henry makes. He points out that because all the
documents have been destroyed sometimes we have to find the information
from people who have handed it down from generation to generation.
This is what I did with the information from my father, but whenever I
do, our resident Putin Puppet says Nyet.
Also some files are overlooked because they were accidentally put in the
wrong folder. This is what happened will a file that some kooks thought
referred to JFK ordering troops into Vietnam when actually is was into
Mississippi.

I'll try to copy and paste as much as I can, but their web site is
littered with defective Javascripts.

Finder of potential Amelia Earhart picture tells story

A newly discovered photo could provide answers to the mystery of Amelia
Earhart.
RANDY HERSCHAFT and MARK KENNEDY , Associated Press , TEGNA 10:02 AM.
CDT July 07, 2017

(Photo: Photograph courtesy of Les Kinney/U.S. National Archives)
CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN GOOGLE+ PINTEREST

NEW YORK (AP) - The retired federal agent who discovered what he
believes is the first photographic evidence of Amelia Earhart alive and
well after crash-landing in the Pacific Ocean during her attempted
round-the-world flight says he didn't initially capture the significance
of the image until years later.

The black-and-white photo is of a group of people standing on a dock on
Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands, including one who seems to be a
slim woman with her back to the camera. A new documentary airing Sunday
on the History channel claims the figure is the famed aviator who
disappeared 80 years ago this month.

Retired U.S. Treasury Agent Les Kinney said in an interview Wednesday
with The Associated Press that he was looking for clues surrounding
Earhart's disappearance in the National Archives in College Park,
Maryland, when he found the photograph in 2012 in a box filled mostly
with text documents from the Office of Naval Intelligence but "didn't
really look at it carefully" because he was looking over thousands of
documents and images.

In 2015, he took another pass at the photo. "I looked at it and I went,
'I can't believe this!'" He asked his wife to come over and pointed to
the seated person, asking if it seemed to her to be a man or a woman.
"She said, 'It's a woman!'" His search led him to identify the ship seen
at the right apparently pulling Earhart's plane wreckage on a barge.

The image is at the heart of the two-hour "Amelia Earhart: The Lost
Evidence," which argues that Earhart, along with her navigator Fred
Noonan, crash-landed in the Japanese-held Marshall Islands, where they
were picked up by the Japanese military and held prisoner.

In the documentary, that photo is subjected to facial-recognition and
other forensic testing, such as torso measurements. Experts on the show
claim the subjects are likely Earhart and Noonan.

Others aren't convinced, including Dorothy Cochrane, a curator at the
National Air and Space Museum and an expert on women in aviation. She
said Thursday the blurry image isn't conclusive. "I cannot say
definitively that this is Amelia Earhart. That doesn't mean that it
might not be, somehow. But you can't say that just through the image the
way it is."

Photographic evidence found in the National Archives that experts say
shows Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan in the Marshall Islands. (Photo:
Photograph courtesy of Les Kinney/U.S. National Archives)

The disappearance of Earhart and Noonan on July 2, 1937, in the Western
Pacific Ocean has been the subject of continuing searches, research and
debate.

The longstanding official theory is that the famed pilot ran out of gas
and crashed into deep ocean waters northwest of Howland Island, a tiny
speck in the South Pacific that she and Noonan missed.

Other theories have claimed Earhart made an emergency landing on a flat
stretch of coral reef off what was then known as Gardner Island,
southwest of Howland, although bone fragments found on the island were
inconclusive. An Australian researcher once proposed that wreckage
spotted by members of his country's military years ago on a Papua New
Guinea island could be hers.

Kinney, who started his career as a naval intelligence agent, said the
photograph he found was in a batch of documents collected by U.S.
sources in anticipation of the 1944 invasion of the Marshall Islands.
"This was a mistake. This was never meant to be there," he said. The
National Archives verified Thursday that the image is from its holdings
and was in a file "unrelated to Earhart."

While the photo is undated, Kinney strongly believes it was taken in
July 1937, and he is convinced it shows Earhart and Noonan, based on
other evidence including physical landmarks and islanders' recollections.

FILE PHOTO - Amelia Earhart stands June 14, 1928 in front of her
bi-plane called "Friendship" in Newfoundland. (Photo by Getty Images)
(Photo: Getty Images, This content is subject to copyright.)

Kinney said the presence of two Caucasians on Jaluit Atoll prior to
World War II was very unusual. The man's distinctive widow's peak seems
to match Noonan's. As for the figure with her back to the camera: "You
have one that has a striking resemblance to Amelia Earhart from the
back, including the short hair."

Kinney suspects the pair may have been picked up by a fishing boat and
handed over to Japanese authorities, who initially may have had no
intention of keeping them. That may explain why there are no handcuffs
or restraints in the photo.

"At the moment in time that you're looking at the photograph, everything
is very good there. I don't think that Noonan or Earhart had any
indication whatsoever that they were not going to be shortly released,"
he said.

Though Cochrane isn't convinced, she respects Earhart as a heroine who
took chances and was a role model for women. "It would be great to solve
it and I'm happy that people are still interested in her, so we'll just
see where it goes," she said.

Shows
This Day In History
Schedule
Topics

Amelia Eartheart, Planes, aviation

FBI Vet Says He's Solved the Mystery of Amelia Earhart's Disappearance

80 years ago, Amelia Earhart disappeared. Now an FBI veteran says he's
solved the mystery.

Amelia Earhart was an American aviator who set many flying records and
championed the advancement of women in aviation. She became the first
woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, and the first person ever
to fly solo from Hawaii to the U.S. mainland. During a flight to
circumnavigate the globe, Earhart disappeared somewhere over the Pacific
in July 1937. Her plane wreckage was never found, and she was officially
declared lost at sea. Her disappearance remains one of the greatest
unsolved mysteries of the twentieth century.
History Vault Promo
Click to Learn More
Promoted by Bella

Amelia Mary Earhart was born in Atchison, Kansas on July 24, 1897. She
defied traditional gender roles from a young age. Earhart played
basketball, took an auto repair course and briefly attended college.

During World War I, she served as a Red Cross nurse’s aid in Toronto,
Canada. Earhart began to spend time watching pilots in the Royal Flying
Corps train at a local airfield while in Toronto.

After the war, she returned to the United States and enrolled at
Columbia University in New York as a pre-med student. Earhart took her
first airplane ride in California in December 1920 with famed World War
I pilot Frank Hawks—and was forever hooked.

In January 1921, she started flying lessons with female flight
instructor Neta Snook. To help pay for those lessons, Earhart worked as
a filing clerk at the Los Angeles Telephone Company. Later that year,
she purchased her first airplane, a secondhand Kinner Airster. She
nicknamed the yellow airplane “the Canary.”

Earhart passed her flight test in December 1921, earning a National
Aeronautics Association license. Two days later, she participated in her
first flight exhibition at the Sierra Airdrome in Pasadena, California.
Earhart’s Aviation Records

Earhart set a number of aviation records in her short career. Her first
record came in 1922 when she became the first woman to fly solo above
14,000 feet.

In 1932, Earhart became the first woman (and second person after Charles
Lindbergh) to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She left Newfoundland,
Canada, on May 20 in a red Lockheed Vega 5B and arrived a day later,
landing in a cow field near Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

Upon returning to the United States, Congress awarded her the
Distinguished Flying Cross—a military decoration awarded for “heroism or
extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight.” She
was the first woman to receive the honor.

Later that year, Earhart made the first solo, nonstop flight across the
United States by a woman. She started in Los Angeles and landed 19 hours
later in Newark, New Jersey. She also became the first person to fly
solo from Hawaii to the United States mainland in 1935.
The Ninety-Nines

Earhart consistently worked to promote opportunities for women in aviation.

In 1929, after placing third in the All-Women’s Air Derby—the first
transcontinental air race for women—Earhart helped to form the
Ninety-Nines, an international organization for the advancement of
female pilots.

She became the first president of the organization of licensed pilots,
which still exists today and represents women flyers from 44 countries.
1937 Flight Around the World

On June 1, 1937, Amelia Earhart took off from Oakland, California, on an
eastbound flight around the world. It was her second attempt to become
the first pilot ever to circumnavigate the globe.

She flew a twin-engine Lockheed 10E Electra and was accompanied on the
flight by navigator Fred Noonan. They flew to Miami, then down to South
America, across the Atlantic to Africa, then east to India and Southeast
Asia.

The pair reached Lae, New Guinea, on June 29. When they reached Lae,
they already had flown 22,000 miles. They had 7,000 more miles to go
before reaching Oakland.
What Happened to Amelia Earhart?

Earhart and Noonan departed Lae for tiny Howland Island—their next
refueling stop—on July 2. It was the last time Earhart was seen alive.
She and Noonan lost radio contact with the U.S. Coast Guard cutter
Itasca, anchored off the coast of Howland Island, and disappeared en route.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized a massive two-week search for
the pair, but they were never found. On July 19, 1937, Earhart and
Noonan were declared lost at sea.

Scholars and aviation enthusiasts have proposed many theories about what
happened to Amelia Earhart. The official position from the U.S.
government is that Earhart and Noonan crashed into the Pacific Ocean,
but there are numerous theories regarding their disappearance.
Crash and Sink Theory

According to the crash and sink theory, Earhart’s plane ran out of gas
while she searched for Howland Island, and she crashed into the open
ocean somewhere in the vicinity of the island.

Several expeditions over the past 15 years have attempted to locate the
plane’s wreckage on the sea floor near Howland. High-tech sonar and
deep-sea robots have failed to yield clues about the Electra’s crash site.
Gardner Island Hypothesis

The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
postulates that Earhart and Noonan veered off-course from Howland Island
and landed instead some 350 miles to the Southwest on Gardner Island,
now called Nikumaroro, in the Republic of Kiribati. The island was
uninhabited at the time.

A week after Earhart’s disappeared, Navy planes flew over the island.
They noted recent signs of habitation but found no evidence of an airplane.

TIGHAR believes that Earhart—and perhaps Noonan—may have survived for
days or even weeks on the island as castaways before dying there. Since
1988, several TIGHAR expeditions to the island have turned up artifacts
and anecdotal evidence in support of this hypothesis.

Some of the artifacts include a piece of Plexiglas that may have come
from the Electra’s window, a woman’s shoe dating back to the 1930s,
improvised tools, a woman’s cosmetics jar from the 1930s and bones that
appeared to be part of a human finger.

In June 2017, a TIGHAR-led expedition arrived on Nikumaroro with four
forensically trained bone-sniffing border collies to search the island
for any skeletal remains of Earhart or Noonan.
Other Theories About Earhart’s Disappearance

There are numerous conspiracy theories about Earhart’s disappearance.
One theory posits that Earhart and Noonan were captured and executed by
the Japanese.

Another theory claims that the pair served as spies for the Roosevelt
administration and assumed new identities upon returning to the United
States.
New Evidence Discovered

According to HISTORY’s investigative special “Amelia Earhart: The Lost
Evidence,” airing Sunday, July 9, retired federal agent Les Kinney
scoured the National Archives for records that may have been overlooked
in the search for the lost aviator.

Among thousands of documents he uncovered was a photograph stamped with
official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) markings reading “Marshall
Islands, Jaluit Atoll, Jaluit Island, Jaluit Harbor.” In the photo, a
ship can be seen towing a barge with an airplane on the back on a
nearby dock are several people.

Kinney argues the photo must have been taken before 1943, as U.S. air
forces conducted more than 30 bombing runs on Jaluit in 1943-44. He
believes the plane on the barge is the Electra, and that two of the
people on the dock are Earhart and Noonan.

As part of the program’s investigation, Doug Carner, a digital forensic
analyst, examined the photo and determined it was authentic and had not
been manipulated, while Kent Gibson, another forensic analyst who
specializes in facial recognition, said it was “very likely” the
individuals in it are Earhart and Noonan. Both analysts identified the
ship in the photo as the Japanese military vessel Koshu Maru, which is
thought to be the ship that took Earhart and Noonan away after their
crash landing.

The Life of Amelia Earhart: Purdue Libraries.

Amelia Earhart: Missing for 80 Years But Not Forgotten: Smithsonian
National Air and Space Museum.

Model, Static, Lockheed Electra, Amelia Earhart: Smithsonian National
Air and Space Museum.

Exclusive: Bone-Sniffing Dogs to Hunt for Amelia Earhart’s Remains:
National Geographic.

Where Is Amelia Earhart? Three Theories but No Smoking Gun: National
Geographic.

The Earhart Project: The International Group for Historic Aircraft
Recovery (TIGHAR).

There is probably a better chance they will find Amelia Earhart than
anybody finding any real evidence that anybody but Oswald took part in the
assassination of JFK.

I could say the same thing about Jimmy Hoffa and D.B. Cooper.

I find it hard to believe that there was a conspiracy to hide
her whereabouts, by the US government.

At the time, Roosevelt was looking desperately, for an excuse
to go war with the axis powers.

And if they did accuse Japan of having captured her, how
could they prove it? The Japanese would just deny it.

I will need to see a *LOT* more evidence for this conspiracy
theory before I buy it.

What Happened to Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan? New Photo Stirs Buzz
Yahoo View July 9, 2017
https://www.yahoo.com/tv/happened-amelia-earhart-fred-noonan-060604508.html

news.com.au
Old US naval intelligence photo said to show Amelia Earhart, her co-pilot
and the wreck of her aircraft
JULY 6, 2017
http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/wtf/old-us-naval-intelligence-photo-said-to-show-amelia-earhart-her-copilot-and-the-wreck-of-her-aircraft/news-story/eff9055c9789eb35c3a0e210ea9ac57e

The Virginian-Pilot
PilotOnline.com
https://pilotonline.com/news/nation-world/national/researchers-think-they-know-where-amelia-earhart-died-days-after/article_53ff25e6-19ec-5a53-a5dc-fdc17b0c4c07.html
US NEWS
Researchers think they know where Amelia Earhart died – days after
a photo suggested she lived
By Cleve R. Wootson Jr.
The Washington Post
Jul 9, 2017 Updated Jul 9, 2017

Retropolis
A newly unearthed photo shows Amelia Earhart survived her final flight,
investigators say
By Amy B Wang July 5
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/07/05/a-newly-unearthed-photo-shows-amelia-earhart-survived-her-final-flight-investigators-say/?utm_term=.a82e6798b4b0

Retropolis
Researchers think they know where Amelia Earhart died — days after
a photo suggested she lived
By Cleve R. Wootson Jr. http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/wtf/old-us-naval-intelligence-photo-said-to-show-amelia-earhart-her-copilot-and-the-wreck-of-her-aircraft/news-story/eff9055c9789eb35c3a0e210ea9ac57eJuly 9
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/07/09/researchers-may-have-found-where-amelia-earhart-died-days-after-a-photo-suggested-she-lived/?utm_term=.7c7bb6d012c3

Smithsonian
Fred Noonan | Time and Navigation
https://timeandnavigation.si.edu/multimedia-asset/fred-noonan
Time and Navigation, The untold story of getting from here to there.

Frederick Joseph "Fred" Noonan
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7099253
Frederick Joseph "Fred" Noonan (1893 - 1937) - Find A Grave Memorial

Amelia Earhart Putnam and Fred Noonan return to U.S. aboard SS Malolo,
after take. HD Stock Footage

The Date Line Theory: Final Thoughts

Potential Effects of the International Date Line on Navigation During
Amelia Earhart's 1937 World Flight

I'm having a hard time understanding this International Date Line theory.
What does the IDL have to do with celestial navigation. Because of the way
the earth rotates, time is not important in calculating latitude but it is
essential in determining longitude. You must accurately know the time to
correctly determine longitude. The time must be a constant and not subject
to local time. I'm guessing the calculations are done via Greenwich Mean
Time. One cannot use local time to calculate longitude because local time
is constantly changing and you have to know what longitude you are at to
determine the correct local time. Therefore crossing the IDL would have no
effect on the calculation of longitude.

Calculating longitude accurately was a problem until a chronometer was
developed that would maintain it's accuracy despite changing temperatures,
humidity, and air pressure. With the earth rotating at roughly 1000 mph, a
discrepancy of a few minutes can make a huge difference in the assessment
of one's longitude.

Will the Search for Amelia Earhart Ever End? | History | Smithsonian
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/will-search-for-amelia-earhart-ever-end-180953646/
He tells me he's “98 percent” sure the piece came from
Earhart's plane. He raises that figure to 99 percent after getting a report
from a leading metallurgist, .

The world looked very different from inside a cockpit in those days,
before radar, GPS or weather satellites. Noonan, a highly regarded pioneer
in aerial navigation, had to rely on sun and star “sights”
to chart a course. The Electra had a radio direction finder, which could
be used to navigate over short distances, but it apparently didn’t
work well enough to be helpful. A Coast Guard cutter, the Itasca, was
standing by near Howland to guide her in. There was a schedule for Earhart
to communicate with the Itasca at specific intervals, but it fell apart,
perhaps because the cutter was in an unusual time zone with a half-hour
offset. For reasons unknown—Gillespie believes the
Electra’s receiving antenna, strung on struts beneath the
fuselage, broke during takeoff at Lae—it appears that Earhart
never heard the Itasca’s increasingly urgent calls.

Well, yeah, but there's no question about the backyard photos
authenticity. (Except maybe from Anthony Anthony, who'd argue that that
big yellow thing in the sky is an egg.)

But go for it if you like.

Don't sweat it. we know what you meant. I was too much of a gentleman to
correct you, because I knew it was just a typo. Almost all the Grammar
Nazis here are Trolls/WC defenders.

Now that Rossley is gone they have to attack me.

Did you watch the program?
They explained everything. One point they made was the the US government
tried to destroy all the records, but one klutz overlooked a key file
which was misfiled. Sounds like a typical CIA screwup of a cover-up even
before he CIA was born. Sorta like taping the door the wrong way on
purpose at the Watergate to get caught.

And a real researcher rather than a loudmouth found the photo which
proves that she was captured alive by the Japanese. The photo analyst
confirmed that the photo was genuine, with a 99.7% certainty. Of course,
the WC defenders attack the acoustical evidence because that was only
proven by 99.9% so they say it could be sunspots or something. Maybe Steve
will say it was balloons popping, not gunshots. One guy says it was
firecrackers, another guy says it was backfires, another guy says it was
farts. Anything to deny facts. Just like you.

Henry made the point which you don't understand because you know nothing
about intelligence, that if they prove the Japanese captured her that
would alert the Japanese to the fact that we had broken their unbreakable
Purple Code. Other lives would be at risk. But of course you don't care
about those lives.

Did any of the deadheads here understand when they explained that Kinny
had been the liaison with several other agencies? Maybe not, because when
I mentioned that my father had been the NSA liaison to other agencies no
one knew what that word means.

False, he was stalling for time. FDR promised to not get the US involved
in the war unless it was directly attacked. So the ONI launched an 8-point
program to trick the Japanese into attacking the US.

Why didn't you learn all this history in college? Oh, that's right, you
never went to college.


Longing for Amelia – The Historical and Mythological Landscape: Matthew Arnold

On May 20, 1937, Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan took off from Oakland, California on the first leg of their historic round-the-world flight. They disappeared 43 days later while trying to locate tiny Howland Island in the remote Pacific. 83 years after Earhart’s disappearance her legend survives in the many individuals still searching for evidence of what happened to her on that fateful day in 1937.

With this photographic project, Matthew Arnold documents the environs that play host to the many theories which attempt to resolve the mystery of Amelia Earhart’s disappearance. The work presented here is from the first stage of Arnold’s project—a five-week expedition to the outer reaches of the Northern Mariana and Marshall Islands, photographing the seascapes and landscapes specific to the “Japanese Capture” theory. It is a theory that involves a forced landing in fortified Japanese territory followed by capture, imprisonment, and possible execution at the hands of their Imperial Navy.

RELATED EVENTS

A Q & A with Matthew Arnold. Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Matthew Arnold: American bomb crater on reef, Wotje Island, Wotje Atoll, Marshall Islands

Matthew Arnold: Japanese pillbox dislodged by the sea, Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll, Marshall Islands


Watch the video: Jaluit Atoll (August 2022).